Minimum wage workers can't afford to rent a 2-bedroom home

Andrew Selsky/AP

Minimum wage workers would have to earn three times the federal wage to rent a modest two-bedroom home anywhere in the country, according to a new report from the National Low Income Housing Coalition.

Workers would need $21.21 per hour to rent a two-bedroom home, and $17.14 for a one-bedroom. On average, renters earn $16.38 across the country, while the mandated federal minimum wage sits at $7.25.

The gap between income and rent is widening. Average income went down by 4%, while rent increased by 6% between 2007 and 2015, Washington Post reports.

Why this matters: Around 11.2 million families spend the majority of their paychecks on rent, and currently only one of every four is eligible for public subsidies. Under President Trump's budget plan, federal funding to the Department of Housing and Urban Development will be slashed by $6.2 billion — significantly reducing housing assitance programs and those programs aimed at helping lower-wage employees.

What's next

⚖️ Live updates: Opening arguments begin in Trump impeachment trial

The second day of the Senate impeachment trial of President Trump will see a full day of opening arguments from Democratic House impeachment managers.

What to watch for: Democrats now have 24 hours — spread out over three days — to take their time to lay out their case against the president's alleged abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. It'll also allow them to highlight gaps that could be filled out by additional witnesses and documents from the administration.

This post will be updated with new developments as the trial continues.

Go deeperArrowJan 21, 2020 - Politics

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America's homelessness crisis isn't going away

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

If the opioid epidemic was the top issue plaguing American cities in the last five years, the most urgent problem of the next five is homelessness, a group of American mayors told reporters in D.C. this week.

Why it matters: Homelessness in the U.S. was on the decline after 2010, but it started to increase again in 2016 — and without moves to address the affordable housing crisis driving the issue, we can expect it to keep getting worse, experts say.

Go deeperArrow2 hours ago - Cities