Apr 1, 2017

Migrant crisis in Niger

Mike Allen, author of AM

Adam Ferguson (@AFergusonPhoto) / The New York Times

Sobering narrative, arresting images, cool tech (a group photo that lets you hover to read an individual story) ... In Sunday's N.Y. Times, a special section on the migrant crisis in landlocked Niger, in the hump of Africa, "The Road to Nowhere," by Dionne Secrecy, West Africa bureau chief:

More than 130,000 people have amassed along this desert highway outside Diffa, Niger — National Route 1. They now call its barren, sandy shoulders home. All of them have been chased from their villages by Boko Haram, the Islamist militant group that kidnaps and kills indiscriminately in a campaign of violence that has lasted eight years. The New York Times spent weeks documenting the stories of people living along this road, interviewing more than 100 residents. ...

Fewer than half of the 137,000 children estimated to be living in the region are in school. ... Unicef has set up 27 small schools along the road. In one, students from Niger, whose national language is French, are being taught in English.

Go deeper

Robert O'Brien: "I don't think there's systemic racism" in law enforcement

White House national security adviser Robert O'Brien said on CNN's "State of the Union" that he doesn't believe there is "systemic racism" among law enforcement in the U.S., arguing that there's "a few bad apples" that are giving police a bad name.

Why it matters: The mass protests that have swept across the United States are not just a response to the death of George Floyd, but of the dozens of high-profile instances of unarmed black men dying at the hands of police officers over the years.

Atlanta mayor on Trump's riot response: "He speaks and he makes it worse"

Atlanta Mayor Keisha Lance Bottoms responded on CNN's "State of the Union" Sunday to President Trump's tweets and comments about the mass protests that have swept across the United States, urging him to "just stop talking."

What she's saying: "This is like Charlottesville all over again. He speaks and he makes it worse. There are times when you should just be quiet. And I wish that he would just be quiet."

Black Americans' competing crises

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

For many black Americans, this moment feels like a crisis within a crisis within a crisis.

The big picture: It's not just George Floyd's killing by police. Or the deaths of EMT Breonna Taylor and jogger Ahmaud Arbery. Or the demeaning of birdwatcher Christian Cooper and journalist Omar Jimenez. Or the coronavirus pandemic's disproportionate harm to African Americans. It's that it's all happening at once.