CEO Satya Nadella (AP/Rafiq Maqbool

Microsoft, Uber and Facebook have issued strong statements of support for DACA, the Obama-era policy that shields 800,000 undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children from deportation. President Trump is reportedly on the verge of ending the program, though the White House said Thursday that he hadn't made up his mind.

What's Next: Expect more tech companies to weigh in strongly in support of keeping the protections. Axios' Mike Allen reported this morning that top CEOs plan to speak out if Trump ends DACA, which also allows the "Dreamers" to obtain work permits.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella:

For me, it comes back to two things: the enduring principles and values that have made the United States what it is, and my own personal story. As I shared at the White House in June, I am a product of two uniquely American attributes: the ingenuity of American technology reaching me where I was growing up, fueling my dreams, and the enlightened immigration policy that allowed me to pursue my dreams.

Uber:

Dreamers grew up here, live here, and are contributing to our communities and our economy. Their contributions make America more competitive and they deserve the opportunity to work, study, and pursue the American dream.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg:

I stand with the Dreamers -- the young people brought to our country by their parents. Many have lived here as long as they can remember. Dreamers have a special love for this country because they can't take living here for granted. They understand all the opportunities they have and want nothing more than the chance to serve their country and their community. And Dreamers deserve that chance.We need a government that protects Dreamers. Today I join business leaders across the country in calling on our President to keep the DACA program in place and protect Dreamers from fear of deportation.

Open letter from FWD.us, signed by business leaders, including the CEOs of Amazon, Apple, Box, eBay, Facebook, Fitbit, GM, Google, Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, Microsoft, Netflix, PayPal, Salesforce and Twitter.

Unless we act now to preserve the DACA program, all 780,000 hardworking young people will lose their ability to work legally in this country, and every one of them will be at immediate risk of deportation. Our economy would lose $460.3 billion from the national GDP and $24.6 billion in Social Security and Medicare tax contributions.Dreamers are vital to the future of our companies and our economy. With them, we grow and create jobs. They are part of why we will continue to have a global competitive advantage.We call on President Trump to preserve the DACA program. We call on Congress to pass the bipartisan DREAM Act or legislation that provides these young people raised in our country the permanent solution they deserve.

Linda Moore, CEO of TechNet, which represents executives from major tech companies including Cisco, Google and Microsoft:

Punishing nearly 800,000 young people in America for the actions of their parents is not the right way to fix our immigration system and would be disruptive to our economy. Ending DACA without anything to replace it would create uncertainty for nearly 800,000 hardworking young people who have passed background checks, paid fees, and are contributing to our economy, pursuing their studies, or even serving in our military.

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