May 25, 2018

Mick Mulvaney wants to reshape the CFPB

Mick Mulvaney testifying before Congress

"Mick Mulvaney Is Having a Blast Running the Agency He Detests ... Trump’s pick to lead the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau says he wants to give it the credibility of the SEC" — Bloomberg's Devin Leonard and Elizabeth Dexheimer.

The backdrop: Mulvaney served three terms in Congress as a member of the Tea Party, where he railed against the premise of the CFPB and its place in America. Now, he's trying to transform it into a government creation that matches his worldview.

  • "Six months into his tenure, Mulvaney [who remains White House budget director while serving as acting CFPB director] is doing everything he can to transform the CFPB from a regulatory crown jewel of liberals."
  • "He’s frozen data collection in the name of security, dropped enforcement cases, and directed staff to slash next year’s budget."
  • "He also wants to curb the agency’s independence by giving Congress — rather than the Federal Reserve — control of its spending, and replace the powerful director position he fills with a five-person commission."
  • Mulvaney: “We are still Elizabeth Warren’s child ... As long as we’re identified with that one person, we’ll never be taken as seriously as a regulator as we should.”
  • Keep reading.

Go deeper

Police officer in George Floyd killing arrested

A protester with a sign with George Floyd's last words. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Derek Chauvin, the Minneapolis police officer involved in the killing of George Floyd, was taken into custody Friday by Minnesota's Bureau of Criminal Apprehension, according to the Star Tribune's Briana Bierschbach.

The state of play: Minnesota Department of Public Safety Commissioner John Harrington said that there was no additional charging information yet, as that decision is in the jurisdiction of the Hennepin County Attorney's Office.

This is a breaking news story and will be updated.

Trump forces fateful choices on Twitter and Facebook

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

President Trump's war with Twitter is confronting social media platforms with a hard dilemma: whether to take fuller responsibility for what people say on their services, or to step back and assume a more quasi-governmental role.

The big picture: Facebook is trying to be more like a government committing to impartiality and protecting free speech and building mechanisms for arbitration. Twitter, pushed by Trump's inflammatory messages, is opting to more aggressively enforce conduct rules on its private property, like a mall owner enforcing rules inside the gates.

Updated 48 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 5,851,494 — Total deaths: 362,238 — Total recoveries — 2,445,181Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 1 p.m. ET: 1,729,185 — Total deaths: 101,706 — Total recoveries: 399,991 — Total tested: 15,646,041Map.
  3. 2020: North Carolina asks RNC if convention will honor Trump's wish for no masks or social distancing.
  4. Public health: Hydroxychloroquine prescription fills exploded in March —How the U.S. might distribute a vaccine.
  5. Transportation: National mobility keeps rising as more states reopen economies.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Saying goodbye to U.S. megacities.