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Mexico's new foreign minister is a government official who resigned after helping to arrange Trump's visit to the country last year. Trump in return had praised Luis Videgaray as a "wonderful man."

With Luis, Mexico and the United States would have made wonderful deals together - where both Mexico and the US would have benefitted. — Trump on Twitter when Vigegaray resigned

Why it matters

: Mexicans were outraged when Videgaray helped bring Trump to Mexico and forced him out of the government. Now their currency is getting hammered, NAFTA might be blown up and U.S. companies are competing for the affections of the president-elect by canceling plans to invest in Mexico. Videgaray is back.

Go deeper

Dave Lawler, author of World
24 mins ago - World

Venezuela's predictable elections herald an uncertain future

The watchful eyes of Hugo Chávez on an election poster in Caracas. Photo: Cristian Hernandez/AFP via Getty

Venezuelans will go to the polls on Sunday, Nicolás Maduro will complete his takeover of the last opposition-held body, and much of the world will refuse to recognize the results.

The big picture: The U.S. and dozens of other countries have backed an opposition boycott of the National Assembly elections on the grounds that — given Maduro's tactics (like tying jobs and welfare benefits to voting), track record, and control of the National Electoral Council — they will be neither free nor fair.

Biden plans to ask public to wear masks for first 100 days in office

Joe Biden. Photo: Mark Makela/Gettu Images

President-elect Joe Biden told CNN on Thursday that he plans to ask the American public to wear face masks for the first 100 days of his presidency.

The big picture: Biden also stated he has asked NIAID director Anthony Fauci to stay on in his current role, serve as a chief medical adviser and be part of his COVID-19 response team when he takes office early next year.