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Activists participate in the 2018 #MeToo March in November 2018 in Hollywood, California. Photo: Sarah Morris/Getty Images

Most Americans say the nationwide sexual misconduct and racial diversity conversations will have little impact in their own place of work, according to a poll from the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research.

Why it matters: Allegations of sexual misconduct in the workplace are on the rise. More than 7,600 sexual harassment claims were filed with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commissions in 2018, a 14% bump from the year before.

By the numbers: 6 in 10 employees in workplaces still say they've had positive results from new harassment and diversity procedures put in place in recent years. But only 21% expect to see beneficial change for working men specifically.

  • The poll finds 45% American workers — 50% of women and 40% of men — have a positive view of the #MeToo movement.
  • 22% of employed Republicans have a favorable opinion of the #MeToo movement, compared to 71% of employed Democrats.
  • 62% of black employees and 58% of Hispanic employees say diversity and inclusion practices were very important factors in accepting their current job.

Methodology: The nationwide survey of 1,000 full-time and part-time employed adults was conducted using AmeriSpeak. Self-employed adults were not included in the survey. Interviews were conducted between July 25 and 30, 2019, online and using landlines and cell phones. The margin of sampling error is +/- 4.2 percentage points.

Go deeper: #MeToo movement drives more mandated sexual harassment training

Go deeper

Kamala Harris resigns from Senate seat ahead of inauguration

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris. Photo: Mason Trinca/Getty Images

Vice President-elect Kamala Harris submitted her resignation from her seat in the U.S. Senate on Monday, two days before she will be sworn into her new role.

What's next: California Gov. Gavin Newsom has selected California Secretary of State Alex Padilla to serve out the rest of Harris' term, which ends in 2022.

2 hours ago - World

Putin foe Navalny to be detained for 30 days after returning to Moscow

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny. Photo: Oleg Nikishin/Epsilon/Getty Images

Russian opposition leader Alexey Navalny has been ordered to remain in pre-trial detention for 30 days, following his arrest upon returning to Russia on Sunday for the first time since a failed assassination attempt last year.

Why it matters: The detention of Navalny, an anti-corruption activist and the most prominent domestic critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin, has already set off a chorus of condemnations from leaders in Europe and the U.S.

Biden picks Warren allies to lead SEC, CFPB

Photo: Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

President-elect Joe Biden has selected FTC commissioner Rohit Chopra to be the next director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) and Obama-era Wall Street regulator Gary Gensler to lead the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

Why it matters: Both picks are progressive allies of Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and viewed as likely to take aggressive steps to regulate big business.