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Memorials hang from the front gate of Greenwood Cemetery to remember the lives lost to COVID-19 on June 08, 2021 in New York City. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Memorials to honor the more than 600,000 Americans who have died from the coronavirus are emerging in states around the country, but a national memorial may be far off, AP reports.

The big picture: State memorials can more easily capture the nuances of remembering the government's response to the pandemic — which is intertwined with remembering the lives lost, according to James Young, founding director of the University of Massachusetts Amherst’s Institute for Holocaust, Genocide and Memory Studies.

  • "We remember not just the victims, but we end up remembering kind of the U.S. administration’s indifference or even neglect, malignant neglect, of the disease itself, much less the victims,” Young told AP.
  • A bill to start the process of erecting a national COVID-19 memorial died in Congress last year, per AP.

Between the lines: In Ohio, native trees that can live for 400 years have been planted to remember the lives lost to the pandemic, per AP.

  • "Maybe someone will come here and will talk about their grandmother, great-grandmother, great-great-grandmother who went through the pandemic," said Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R).
  • In Washington, D.C., 250,000 white flags were placed at RFK stadium in honor of deaths from the virus.
  • And a garden of hand-sculpted flowers popped up in Florida.

Go deeper: How we'll memorialize COVID

Go deeper

Updated 18 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Vaccines: FDA approves Pfizer boosters for high-risk individuals, people 65 and up — Team USA to mandate vaccine for Winter Olympic hopefuls — U.S. to buy 500 million more Pfizer doses to share with the world.
  2. Health: Some experts see signs of hope as cases fall — WHO: Nearly 1 in 4 Afghan COVID hospitals shut after Taliban takeover — D.C. goes further than area counties with vaccine mandates.
  3. Politics: Bolsonaro isolating after health minister tests positive at UN summit — United Airlines says 97% of U.S. employees fully vaccinated — Mormon Church to mandate masks in temples.
  4. Education: Asymptomatic Florida students exposed to COVID no longer have to quarantine — Education Department investigating Texas mask mandate ban — D.C. schools to require teachers, staff to receive vaccine without testing option.
  5. Variant tracker: Where different strains are spreading.
Sep 23, 2021 - Health

Asymptomatic Florida students exposed to COVID no longer have to quarantine

Gov. Ron DeSantis during a September news conference in Viera, Florida. Photo: Paul Hennessy/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis announced Wednesday an emergency order allowing parents to decide whether their children should quarantine or stay in school if they're exposed to COVID-19, provided they're asymptomatic.

Why it matters: People infected with COVID-19 can spread the coronavirus starting from two days before they display symptoms, according to the CDC. Quarantine helps prevent the virus' spread.

Sep 23, 2021 - Health

Jesse Jackson released from rehab hospital

Rev. Jesse Jackson. Photo: Jason Mendez/Getty Images

The Rev. Jesse Jackson was released from a Chicago rehabilitation hospital on Wednesday after receiving treatment for Parkinson's disease following a breakthrough COVID-19 case, per CBS News.

The big picture: Shirley Ryan AbilityLab had treated the civil rights leader for occupational and physical therapy after Jackson was transferred on Aug. 27 following a week in a hospital with COVID-19. Both he and his wife, Jacqueline Jackson, were hospitalized with the virus in August.