Megyn Kelly landed a one-on-one with Russian President Vladimir Putin for tonight's debut of her "Sunday Night" (7 on NBC, against "60 Minutes"). David Ignatius says she was tough on him in a roundtable that she moderated as part of her St. Petersburg trip:

"[A] session with Kelly ... included sharp questions about the hacking scandal, Syria and Ukraine — and Putin grew increasingly aggressive, sarcastic and peeved."

As part of Megyn Kelly's P.R. push ahead of the show, NBC offered us a brief phone interview, which we taped while awaiting the closing of the boarding door on the DCA-LGA shuttle, with a passenger in first class summoning a flight attendant because my hushed conversation in coach was disturbing his reverie:

  • How Kelly sees herself: "I think that if there's one thing most people know about me, it's that I'm not in the tank for either side ... So, when it comes to covering politics and the Trump administration, I think I've earned the trust of the viewers that is important and unique."
  • Her plans for the show: "[C]able news is largely political. You can get some other stuff in, but I was at least 85% political. And being over here has allowed me ... to do things other than politics, and I actually think the country could really use some of that right now."
  • Sneak peek: "[O]ne of the first interviews we're going to roll out ... is when I sit down with [stalked sportcaster] Erin Andrews ... [W]e both cried. We talked about everything from really scary health issues to really scary stalker issues, to love to ... women working in a man's industry."
  • What she did in her four months off, because of restrictions in her Fox contract: "I thought that on my 'garden leave' ... I would be at the Met every day and I would be working out ... And what I found is that I have two speeds: 0 and 100. ... I was walking around my apartment ... bothering our housekeeper, who really was desperate to see me go back to work."
  • Did you watch much TV news? "No, not much at all. In fact, I started to consume my news by print."
  • Like a newspaper?! "I subscribed to The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal."

Go deeper

Liberty University's Jerry Falwell Jr. agrees to “indefinite leave of absence”

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. in 2019. Photo: Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Jerry Falwell Jr. will take an “indefinite leave of absence” from his roles as president and chancellor of Liberty University after posting a photo of himself with unzipped pants and an arm around a woman on social media, according to the school.

The state of play: The picture, which has since been deleted, drew backlash and charges of hypocrisy from conservative political figures because the university's honor code strictly prohibits students from having "sexual relations outside of a biblically-ordained marriage," and recommends they dress with“appropriateness” and “modesty."

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 19,189,737 — Total deaths: 716,669 — Total recoveries — 11,610,192Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 4 p.m. ET: 4,917,050 — Total deaths: 160,702 — Total recoveries: 1,598,624 — Total tests: 59,652,675Map.
  3. Politics: White House recommends Trump issue executive orders on coronavirus aid.
  4. Education: Cuomo says all New York schools can reopen for in-person learning.
  5. Public health: Surgeon general urges flu shots to prevent "double whammy" with coronavirus.
  6. World: Africa records over 1 million coronavirus cases — Gates Foundation puts $150 million behind coronavirus vaccine production.

White House recommends Trump issue executive orders on coronavirus aid

Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin (L) and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows speak to the media on Capitol Hill. Photo: Mandel Ngan/AFP via Getty Images.

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin said President Trump should sign executive orders unilaterally addressing coronavirus stimulus spending after negotiations with congressional Democrats stalled again on Friday.

Why it matters: Friday was viewed as a self-imposed deadline to negotiate a new relief bill. But after an intense week of negotiations on Capitol Hill, White House and Democratic leadership failed to reach a deal on delivering much needed aid to Americans and businesses.