White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows continued his criticism of FBI Director Christopher Wray on Sunday, but he said President Trump still has confidence in him as of this moment.

What's he's saying: "The minute that the president loses confidence in any of his Cabinet members — they serve at his pleasure — he will certainly look at replacing them," Meadows told CBS' "Face the Nation" on Sunday.

  • "There are different degrees of confidence in different Cabinet members and certainly he’s still there," Meadows said.

Background: Earlier this week, Meadows dismissed Wray’s testimony before the Senate Homeland Security Committee that the U.S. has never historically seen evidence of widespread voter fraud, including by mail.

  • "With all due respect to Director Wray, he has a hard time finding emails in his own FBI," Meadows said on Friday. "Perhaps he needs to get involved on the ground and then he would change his testimony on Capitol Hill."

The big picture: Meadows' criticism of Wray's testimony on questions of voter fraud highlights the Trump administration's strategy to sow doubt in November's election results by challenging the legitimacy of mail-in ballots, which are expected to skew heavily in Democrats' favor.

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Meadows confirms Trump's tweets "declassifying" Russia documents were false

Photo: Tom Williams-Pool/Getty Images

White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows confirmed in court on Tuesday that President Trump's tweets authorizing the disclosure of documents related to the Russia investigation and Hillary Clinton's emails "were not self-executing declassification orders," after a federal judge demanded that Trump be asked about his intentions.

Why it matters: BuzzFeed News reporter Jason Leopold cited the tweets in an emergency motion seeking to gain access to special counsel Robert Mueller's unredacted report as part of a Freedom of Information Act request. This is the first time Trump himself has indicated, according to Meadows, that his tweets are not official directives.

Dave Lawler, author of World
13 mins ago - World

Special report: Trump's hopes of nuclear deal with Putin come down to the wire

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

A surprise offer from Vladimir Putin has the U.S. and Russia once again circling a potential pre-election nuclear deal.

The big picture: The last treaty constraining the U.S. and Russia, New START, is due to expire on Feb. 5, 2021, two weeks after the next U.S. presidential inauguration. For the first time since the height of the Cold War, the nuclear guardrails could come off.

The cliffhanger could be ... Georgia

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

It hasn't backed a Democrat for president since 1992, but Georgia's changing demographics may prove pivotal this year — not only to Trump v. Biden, but also to whether Democrats take control of the Senate.

Why it matters: If the fate of the Senate did hinge on Georgia, it might be January before we know the outcome. Meanwhile, voters' understanding of this power in the final days of the election could juice turnout enough to impact presidential results.