Mar 13, 2018

McConnell says "unlikely" Senate will upend Trump's tariffs

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky. Photo: Tom Williams / CQ Roll Call

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said Tuesday that it is “highly unlikely” lawmakers in the Senate will approve legislation to rollback President Trump’s recent move imposing heightened tariffs on imported steel and aluminum.

“The thought that the president would sign a bill that would undo actions he’s taken strikes me as remote at best, and I like to use floor time in the Senate for things that actually have a chance to become law. So I think it’s highly unlikely we’d be dealing with that in a legislative way.”
— McConnell told reporters at his weekly news conference

He did, however, highlight that Republicans — who largely lambasted Trump's move — are still concerned about the tax implications and will continue engaging the White House with hopes that “in the end this will be a narrowed process rather than a broad application.”

The backdrop: Trump's announcement that the U.S. is imposing tariffs of 25% on steel and 10% on aluminum has triggered outcry among GOP lawmakers and industry officials. He later decided to exempt Canada and Mexico, for now. Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), a retiring Trump critic, has introduced a bill seeking to nullify the tariffs.

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  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 5 a.m. ET: 5,595,091 — Total deaths: 350,752 — Total recoveries — 2,300,985Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 5 a.m. ET: 1,681,418 — Total deaths: 98,929 — Total recoveries: 384,902 — Total tested: 14,907,041Map.
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  4. Congress: House Republicans to sue Nancy Pelosi in effort to block proxy voting.
  5. Tech: Twitter fact-checks Trump's tweets about mail-in voting for first timeGoogle to open offices July 6 for 10% of workers.
  6. Public health: Coronavirus antibodies could give "short-term immunity," CDC says, but more data is neededCDC releases guidance on when you can be around others after contracting the virus.
  7. What should I do? When you can be around others after contracting the coronavirus — Traveling, asthma, dishes, disinfectants and being contagiousMasks, lending books and self-isolatingExercise, laundry, what counts as soap — Pets, moving and personal healthAnswers about the virus from Axios expertsWhat to know about social distancingHow to minimize your risk.
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Updated 19 mins ago - Politics & Policy

When going back to work isn't safe

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

As states open up, businesses are starting to call their employees back to work, but many don’t feel safe going back.

Why it matters: This is poised to be the next big challenge in the American economy: workers may be forced to chose between their health and their livelihood.

Minneapolis unrest as hundreds protest death of George Floyd

Tear gas is fired as police clash with protesters demonstrating against the death of George Floyd outside the 3rd Precinct Police Precinct in Minneapolis, Minnesota, on Tuesday. Photo: Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

Minneapolis police used tear gas during clashes with protesters demonstrating Tuesday night over the death of George Floyd, an African American who died in police custody, according to multiple news reports and images shared to social media.

Driving the news: The FBI is investigating Floyd's death after video emerged of a Minneapolis police officer kneeling on his neck for several minutes, ignoring protests that he couldn't breathe. Hundreds of protesters attended the demonstration at the intersection where Floyd died, per the Guardian.