Nov 27, 2017

McCain on Hillary Clinton: "the hardest thing to do is just to shut up"

John McCain and Hillary Clinton. Photos: Patrick Semansky and Matt Rourke / AP

Esquire posts a big interview of Sen. John McCain by David Usborne: "[A]fter the senator was diagnosed with brain cancer in July, his contrarian resolve revealed itself in unexpected ways that may shape his legacy — and our future."

McCain says he resisted the temptation to immediately set the record straight with his own lengthy account, as Hillary Clinton did recently in What Happened. "You've got to understand that you can't rewrite history," he told me. "One of the almost irresistible impulses you have when you lose is to somehow justify why you lost and how you were mistreated: 'I did the right thing! I did!' The hardest thing to do is to just shut up."

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  • And while McCain has lately announced plans for his own memoir, which will reach back to 2008, he suggested Clinton had erred in writing hers so quickly.
  • "What's the fucking point? Keep the fight up? History will judge that campaign, and it's always a period of time before they do. You've got to move on. This is Hillary's problem right now: She doesn't have anything to do."
  • On the health care vote: Vice President Pence tried to persuade him both on the Senate floor and in his private office, where McCain took a call from Trump. "I said, 'I thank you, Mr. President, for your involvement,' " he told me. "But I said, 'I cannot vote for something called Skinny Repeal. I can't do it. I didn't even see the bill until today. I mean, this is insanity. I appreciate the call and now I have to go vote, and I'm sorry.' "

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U.S. coronavirus updates: 3 out of 4 Americans forced to stay home

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins; Map: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

At least 30 state governors and the District to Columbia have ordered their residents to stay home to promote social distancing and limit community spread from the coronavirus pandemic.

The big picture: Those states account for about 3/4 of the American population, the N.Y. Times notes. More cities like Boston, Detroit, New Orleans and Philadelphia, are reporting an influx of cases, prompting states to take stronger actions.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 7 mins ago - Health

America under lockdown

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

If you thought March felt like the longest month in American history, just wait for April and May, when people will be forced to witness spring from the indoors.

The big picture: 28 states are in or entering lockdown, with Maryland and Virginia joining those ranks today. So is D.C., as its mayor made official this afternoon. Those states include roughly 3/4 of the American people, the N.Y. Times notes.

Ford, GE aim to make 50,000 ventilators in 100 days

A Model A-E ventilator, left, and a simple test lung. The ventilator uses a design that operates on air pressure without the need for electricity, addressing the needs of most COVID-19 patients. Photo: Ford

Ford and GE Healthcare announced plans on Monday to build a simplified ventilator design licensed from a Florida medical technology company, with the goal of producing 50,000 machines by early July, and up to 30,000 a month thereafter, to fight the coronavirus.

Why it matters: The companies are moving in "Trump time" to meet demand for urgently needed ventilators, says White House Defense Production Act Coordinator Peter Navarro. But with deaths expected to peak in two weeks, the machines won't arrive in large numbers in time to help the hardest-hit cities.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 11 mins ago - Health