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Photo: James L. Amos/Corbis via Getty Images

The largest civil disobedience campaign of the 21st century is happening now in 38 states across the nation.

What's new: 50 years after Martin Luther King, Jr. was assassinated, faith leaders are reviving his Poor People's Campaign (PPC). They have held protests every Monday for the past five weeks to spark a national "moral revival." Today marks the beginning of the last week of the 40 Days of Action campaign, which will culminate in a march on Washington on June 23rd.

How it happened: Organizers started the project three years ago and collected testimonials from struggling Americans to shape their demands. They came out of the project with six general themes, ranging from raising teacher salaries to voter disenfranchisement. Protestors have presented the demands at their state capitols.

Why it matters: According to the AP, 13% of Americans lived in poverty in 1968. Despite consistent economic development, wealth inequality and cost of living have grown and the poverty rate is back at 13%.

  • In an interview with Axios, PPC co-chair Rev. Liz Theoharis argued that politicians have forgotten the issues of America's poor.
In the 25-26 debates before the 2016 election... not one focused on the issues facing poor people.
— Rev. Liz Theoharis

Drawing attention: According to Theoharis, the PPC has trended nationally on Twitter on every one of the last five days of action, and protestors have gotten creative in expressing their demands — with many seeking arrest.

  • Nearly 100 protestors and faith leaders were arrested in front of the Supreme Court last week for blocking the street. Nine faith leaders were held overnight in jail.
  • On Tuesday, Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) and Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) called for a hearing on Capitol Hill to hear from protestors. Three other senators and four other representatives attended.
  • On June 4, protestors in Alabama acknowledged the birthday of Jefferson Davis by covering up a statue with a banner and were promptly arrested. On the same day, demonstrators in California covered a statue of Christopher Columbus inside the state capitol with a multi-colored parachute.

What's next: After the march on Washington, the campaign plans to train their attention on voter registration and for each state to continue to carry their demands forward. Sen. Warren urged that "[w]e are going to make change from this," at her congressional hearing, but concrete results remain to be seen.

Go deeper

1 min ago - World

NYT: Biden won't immediately remove U.S. tariffs on China

President-elect Joe Biden during an event in Wilmington, Delaware, on Tuesday. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump's 25% tariffs imposed on China under the phase one trade deal will remain in place at the start of the new administration, President-elect Biden said in an interview with the New York Times published early Wednesday.

Details: "I'm not going to make any immediate moves, and the same applies to the tariffs," Biden said. He plans to conduct a full review of the current U.S. policy on China and speak with key allies in Asia and Europe to "develop a coherent strategy," he said.

Trump threatens to veto Defense spending bill over social media shield

Photo: Erin Schaff - Pool/Getty Images

President Trump tweeted Tuesday a threat to veto a must-pass end-of-year $740 billion bill defense-spending authorization bill unless Congress repeals a federal law that protects social media sites from legal liability.

Why it matters: Trump's attempt to get Congress to end the tech industry protections under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act is the latest escalation in his war on tech giants over what he and some other Republicans perceive as bias against conservatives.

The walls close in on Trump

Photo: Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images

With Bill Barr's "Et tu, Brute!" interview with AP, President Trump is watching the walls close in on his claims of fraud, hoaxes and conspiracies.

Why it matters: Trump and his legal team continue to claim election fraud. But the Republican governors of Arizona and Georgia have certified their elections, a loyalist like Barr has weighed in, and lower-ranking officials have taken potshots.

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