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Rick Bowmer / AP

Some takeaways from my on-stage conversation yesterday with Mark Cuban, from yesterday's Lerer Hippeau CEO Summit in New York (yes, LH is an Axios investor).

Cuban is a major believer in the earthquake power of artificial intelligence and machine learning, arguing that massive labor disruptions are coming sooner than later. His proposed solution isn't universal basic income, but rather twofold:

  • A lot of low-skilled jobs can be replaced by what will be an increased demand for data tagging and labeling. Not intellectually fulfilling work, but the 21st century version of an assembly line.
  • A broad expansion of programs like Americorps, believing that macro economic benefits from automation can be reallocated to places school classrooms and domestic infrastructure projects.

Other takeaways:

  1. He does not like to be referred to as a "venture capitalist," because he "helps his companies." Yes, Cuban said this as a VC-hosted event.
  2. Yes, he bakes in a "TV exposure" premium when thinking about valuations on Shark Tank.Cuban does not agree with my CEO President Theory, which posits that American voters will view future CEO candidates through a Trump prism (if successful, then we'll get more; if failed, then that's it for a while): "There's nobody like Donald Trump. He's just an idiot."If Cuban does run for president in a few years (something he won't rule out), he believes it's more likely to be against President Pence than President Trump.Cuban believes that Zaza Pachulia ― who once played for the Dallas Mavericks ― is "clumsy," not "dirty."

Go deeper

Cold December as safety nets expire

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Safety nets are likely to be yanked from underneath millions of vulnerable Americans in December, as the coronavirus surges.

Why it matters: Those most at risk are depending on one or more relief programs that are set to expire, right as the economic recovery becomes more fragile than it's been in months.

15 hours ago - Health

Food banks feel the strain without holiday volunteers

People wait in line at Food Bank Community Kitchen on Nov. 25 in New York City. Photo: Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for Food Bank For New York City

America's food banks are sounding the alarm during this unprecedented holiday season.

The big picture: Soup kitchens and charities, usually brimming with holiday volunteers, are getting far less help.

17 hours ago - Health

AstraZeneca CEO: "We need to do an additional study" on COVID vaccine

Photo: Pavlo Gonchar/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

AstraZeneca CEO Pascal Soriot said on Thursday the company is likely to start a new global trial to measure how effective its coronavirus vaccine is, Bloomberg reports.

Why it matters: Following Phase 3 trials, Oxford and AstraZeneca said their vaccine was 90% effective in people who got a half dose followed by a full dose, and 62% effective in people who got two full doses.