May 16, 2017

Mark Cuban: Tagging data is the low-skilled job of tomorrow

Evan Vucci / AP

The spread of artificial intelligence technology will create great demand for workers to "tag and label data," Mark Cuban argued at an event staged by VC firm Lerer Hippeau in New York Tuesday. "In order for machine learning, deep learning ... to be effective and work the most quickly, the more data that is tagged and defined and labeled correctly the quicker everything goes," he told Axios' Dan Primack.

Prepare yourself for the future: Cuban is a big believer in the power of AI, and its power to disturb labor markets. "There's going to be more disruption sooner than people have expected over the next 4 or 5 years," he said. According to Cuban, we all should be preparing for a workplace dominated by this new technology. The important question, he argues, is not how many jobs it will destroy, "The real question is how is it going to disrupt your job."

What jobs will go? Cuban argued that we're already seeing the evidence of the application of new labor-saving technology, pointing to the example of Ford's plans to cut 10% of its workforce even as revenues are near record highs. He listed non-trial corporate lawyers, accountants and book keepers, insurance adjusters, and doctors as key jobs that will be partially eliminated or greatly changed by machine learning and AI.

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The aftermath of George Floyd's death: Everything you need to know

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Former Minneapolis police officer Derek Chauvin is in jail under $500,000 bail on charges of third-degree murder and manslaughter after a video of him kneeling on George Floyd's neck for more than eight minutes and Floyd's death catapulted the country's major cities into a state of protest.

The big picture: Floyd's fatal run-in with police is the latest reminder of the disparities between black and white communities in the U.S. and comes as African Americans grapple with higher death rates from the coronavirus and higher unemployment from trying to stem its spread.

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Live updates: SpaceX attempts to launch NASA astronauts Saturday

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At 3:22 p.m. ET today, SpaceX is expected to launch NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley to the International Space Station for the first time.

Why it matters: The liftoff — should it go off without a hitch — will be the first time a private company has launched people to orbit. It will also bring crewed launches back to the U.S. for the first time in nine years, since the end of the space shuttle program.

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In photos: Protesters clash with police nationwide over George Floyd

Police officers grapple with protesters in Atlanta. Photo: Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Police used tear gas, rubber bullets and pepper spray as the protests sparked by the killing of George Floyd spread nationwide on Friday evening.

The big picture: Police responded in force in cities ranging from Atlanta to Des Moines, Houston to Detroit, Milwaukee to Washington, D.C. and Denver to Louisville. In Los Angeles, police declared a stretch of downtown off limits, with Oakland issuing a similar warning.