Sep 21, 2019

13 U.S. Marines charged amid human smuggling probe

A U.S. Marine supervises as other Marines install razor wire next to the U.S.-Mexico border fence on December 2, 2018 as seen from Tijuana, Mexico. Photo: John Moore/Getty Images

13 U.S. Marines face charges including failure to obey orders, perjury, drunkenness, larceny and endangerment after being detained in July in a human smuggling probe, L.A. Times reports.

Catch up quick: 5 of the Marines "were charged with having direct involvement in the human smuggling conspiracy," a 1st Marine Division spokesperson told the L.A. Times. None of the 13 Marines charged were reportedly involved in "overall" U.S.-Mexico border support missions, the Marines told L.A. Times.

  • "The investigation into the human smuggling ring started after two Marines were arrested after picking up at least three unauthorized immigrants near Jacumba Hot Springs on July 3, authorities said," L.A. Times reports.

Background: Human smuggling involves supplying a service — such as transportation or false documents — to a person who "voluntarily seeks to gain illegal entry into a foreign country," according to ICE and the Department and Homeland Security.

  • "It is possible the crime may start out as human smuggling but quickly turn into human trafficking," the agencies say.

Go deeper: Marine boot camp will integrate men and women for first time

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$13.5 million grant to assist human-trafficking victims delayed

Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration postponed a $13.5 million grant to house and support victims of human trafficking in September, NBC News reports.

Where it stands: A Department of Justice spokesperson told NBC that "the agency asked for the funds back from HUD and ... DOJ will now run the program itself." Noncitizens were newly listed as recipients for the grant on Sept. 4, just 5 days before the grant solicitation was delayed.

Go deeperArrowOct 1, 2019

HR experts fear Trump impeachment could fuel "toxic" workplaces

Photo: Carlos Osorio/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Human resources experts say the impeachment inquiry into Donald Trump and a potentially divisive 2020 election could make for tense work environments across the country, MarketWatch reports.

Why it matters: "Toxic" offices have already costed companies $223 billion over the last 5 years, according to the Society for Human Resources Management. An even more politically polarized country could further vex businesses struggling to maintain peace at the water cooler.

Go deeperArrowSep 27, 2019

GitHub and Microsoft employees protest renewed contract with ICE

Anti-ICE protestors in New York City in September targeted businesses profiting from the crisis at the border. Photo: Erik McGregor/LightRocket via Getty Images

GitHub employees sent a letter to their CEO on Wednesday demanding the tech company drop its recently renewed, $200,000 contract with Immigration and Customs Enforcement, citing human rights concerns, the Washington Post reports.

What's new: Employees from Microsoft are circulating a letter endorsing their Github subsidiary to cancel the contract after GitHub CEO Nat Friedman stood by the platform's renewal with the government agency, Bloomberg reports.

Go deeperArrowUpdated Oct 10, 2019