Maria Butina. Photo: STR/AFP via Getty IMages

The Senate Intel Committee and Maria Butina's counsel have both agreed to release documents surrounding the alleged Russian agent to the Department of Justice, reports Politico.

The details: The committee interviewed Butina during their investigation into Russian influence on the 2016 election. The records and transcripts of those interviews will be part of the materials turned over to the federal government.

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10 mins ago - Axios on HBO

Preview: "Axios on HBO" interviews Bob Woodward

On the next episode of "Axios on HBO," journalist Bob Woodward tells Axios National Political Correspondent Jonathan Swan why he spoke out about President Trump being the "wrong man for the job."

  • "I did not want to join the ranks of the Senate Republicans who know that Trump is the wrong man for the job, but won't say it publicly," Woodward said.

Catch the full interview on Monday, Sept. 28 at 11 p.m. ET/PT on all HBO platforms.

Updated 19 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 32,601,345 — Total deaths: 989,761 — Total recoveries: 22,512,527Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 10 a.m. ET: 7,034,824 — Total deaths: 203,789 — Total recoveries: 2,727,335 — Total tests: 99,488,275Map.
  3. States: "We’re not closing anything going forward": Florida fully lifts COVID restaurant restrictions.
  4. Health: Young people accounted for 20% of cases this summer.
  5. Business: Coronavirus has made airports happier places The expiration of Pandemic Unemployment Assistance looms.
  6. Education: Summer college enrollment offers a glimpse of COVID-19's effect.

Where Amy Coney Barrett stands on the biggest issues

Photo: Aurora Samperio/NurPhoto via Getty Images

Judge Amy Coney Barrett — expected to be named by President Trump today to succeed Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg — would give conservatives a 6-3 majority on the Supreme Court, and an edge on issues from abortion to the limits of presidential power.

The big picture: Republicans love the federal appeals court judge's age — she is only 48 — and her record as a steadfast social conservative.