The 2019 NCAA Men's Final Four National Championship. Photo: Jamie Schwaberow/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

An advocacy group for college athletes urged the NCAA to consider holding March Madness with no fans as a way to protect against the coronavirus, and the NCAA didn't dismiss the idea out of hand, AP reports.

The state of play: The games, which begin on March 17, still would be televised.

What they're saying: "Today we are planning to conduct our championships as planned; however, we are evaluating the COVID-19 situation daily and will make decisions accordingly," the NCAA said.

By the numbers: Total attendance for the 2019 men's tournament was 688,753, an average of 19,132 per game.

  • Attendance for the 2019 women's tournament was 274,873, an average of 6,545 per game.

Of note: The men's Final Four will be played the first weekend in April at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in Atlanta, and the women's Final Four is set for Smoothie King Center in New Orleans.

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