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Eric Risberg / AP

The biggest concern among many carmakers isn't that they will lose ground to an auto industry rival. It's that all the companies that build cars will become like the companies that manufacture cell phones: hollowed-out shells that cede most of the value to software makers like Apple and Google.

"Car CEOs, the new generation, they're all working on this," venture capitalist Marc Andreessen told Bloomberg View. "They're spending a lot of time out here and they're spending a lot of time with us. But literally, the way they frame that question is, 'We, existing car company, do not want to be the Nokia of cars.'"

It's definitely an outcome that worried just-ousted Ford CEO Mark Fields. In a 2015 interview Fields told me he worried about ceding too much room in the car to Apple and Google. "At the end of the day we don't want to end up as the handset business," he said.

Andreessen is an investor in Comma.ai and DeepMap, both of whom make self-driving car software.

"Obviously there's a lot more software in cars than there was 10 or 20 years ago," Andreessen said. "Everybody knows that. It's a step further to say that in 10 years, the winning car company will be the car company that makes the best software."

Comma.ai even has this quote at the bottom of its Web site.

We didn't do anything wrong, but somehow, we lost. -nokia, or car companies in 5 years

Google parent Alphabet and Apple, meanwhile, are plowing ahead with car strategies. Apple's of course, remains largely secretive, while Google is plain about its strategy, which includes both its Waymo self-driving car unit and its effort to have Android power in-car entertainment systems.

Go deeper

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Kevin McCarthy's rude awakening

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy. Photo: Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Kevin McCarthy is learning you can get torched when you try to make everyone happy, especially after an insurrection.

Why it matters: The House Republican leader had been hoping to use this year to build toward taking the majority in 2022, but his efforts to bridge intra-party divisiveness over the Capitol siege have him taking heat from every direction, eroding his stature both with the public and within his party.

The next big political war: redistricting

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Democrats are preparing a mix of tech and legal strategies to combat expected gerrymandering by Republicans, who are planning to go on legal offense themselves.

Why it matters: Democrats failed to regain a single state legislature on Election Day, while Republicans upped their control to 30 states' Houses and Senates. In the majority of states, legislatures draw new congressional district lines, which can boost a party's candidates for the next decade.

42 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Vaccinations, relief timing dominate Sweet 16 call

Sen. Joe Manchin (D-W.V.) speaks during a news conference in December with a group of bipartisan lawmakers. Photo: Caroline Brehman/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

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Why it matters: Given Democrats' razor-thin majority in both chambers of Congress, President Biden will have to rely heavily on this group of centrist lawmakers — dubbed the "Sweet 16" — to pass any substantial legislation.