Apr 13, 2017

Mar-a-Lago had 13 health violations

Alex Brandon / AP

Florida inspectors dug around Trump's Mar-a-Lago resort in the days leading up to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's state visit, and found 13 health violations in the club's kitchen, which is a record for a place that charges $200k in membership fees, according to the Miami Herald.

The violations: Three violations were deemed "high priority," meaning they were prone to carrying bacteria that could make customers violently ill. The other 10 violations weren't as serious, including one that described water at the sink where employees wash their hands as too cold to successfully sanitize them.

Food for thought:

  1. Fish designed to be served raw or undercooked had not undergone proper parasite destruction. Kitchen staffers were ordered to cook the fish immediately or throw it out.
  2. In two of the club's coolers, inspectors found that raw meats that should have been stored at 41 degrees were too warm and potentially dangerous: chicken was 49 degrees, duck and raw beef were stored at 50 degrees, and ham clocked in at 57 degrees.
  3. The club was cited for not maintaining the coolers in proper working condition and was ordered to have them emptied immediately and repaired.

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