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Due to a series of factors, including a D.C. holiday and April 15 falling on the weekend, federal taxes aren't actually due to be filed until today.

Early filers: More people than ever are filing their taxes early this year. Adobe estimates that 59% of online tax returns were filed in January and February this year, with early traffic to online tax sites up 2% from last year.

Procrastinators: The exception is millennials, who are more likely this year than last to file in the last day, according to a survey. Adobe says 12.4% of millennials are expected to wait until the last 24 hours, compared to 6.6% last year.

And while early traffic to tax sites was slightly up, overall the online shift appears to have stagnated. As the deadline neared, Adobe estimated that many filers gave up their online efforts and turned to a tax preparer.

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Here are some other findings:

  • People aren't splurging. Most refunds are going to things like bills or school, though people aren't necessarily happy about that.
  • PCs still key to online filings: While more work is being done on smartphones, 87% of online filers do so via their computers. By April, traffic from smartphones to online tax sites drops by half.
  • Ice cream over booze: Adobe found junk food was the vice of choice for those dealing with tax-related stress, with 17 percent going for something sweet, compared to 12 percent who indulged in a drink or two.

If you haven't filed: You have until midnight to file your taxes or request an extension. You can get an extension to delay your return until Oct. 15, but you still have to pay what you owe or face penalties.

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Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

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  3. Health: Americans won't take Trump's word on the vaccine, Axios-Ipsos poll finds.
  4. States: NYC's coronavirus positivity rate spikes to highest since June.
  5. Sports: Tennessee Titans close facility amid NFL's first coronavirus outbreak.
  6. World: U.K. beats previous record for new coronavirus cases.

NYC's coronavirus positivity rate spikes to highest since June

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio. Photo: Noam Galai/Getty Images

New York City's coronavirus positivity rate has ticked up to 3.25%, its highest since June, Mayor Bill de Blasio said at a news conference on Tuesday.

Why it matters: The jump — from 1.93% on Monday — came on the first day that public elementary classrooms reopened in the city after months of closures, but guidelines state that all public schools will have to shut if the citywide seven-day positivity rate stays above 3%.

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AppHarvest is going public

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

AppHarvest, a Morehead, Ky.-based developer of large-scale tomato greenhouses, is going public via a reverse merger with a SPAC called Novus Capital (Nasdaq: NOVSU). The company would have an initial market value of around $1 billion.

Why it's a BFD: This is about to be a "unicorn" based in one of America's poorest congressional districts. AppHarvest CEO Jonathan Webb tells Axios that the company will employ around 350 people in Morehead by year-end, and that its location allows its product to reach 75% of the continental U.S. within a one-day drive.