Sign up for our daily briefing

Make your busy days simpler with Axios AM/PM. Catch up on what's new and why it matters in just 5 minutes.

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Catch up on coronavirus stories and special reports, curated by Mike Allen everyday

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Denver news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Denver

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Des Moines news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Des Moines

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Minneapolis-St. Paul news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Twin Cities

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Tampa Bay news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Tampa Bay

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Charlotte news in your inbox

Catch up on the most important stories affecting your hometown with Axios Charlotte

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Please enter a valid email.

Please enter a valid email.

Subscription failed
Thank you for subscribing!

Sample of a digital targeted ad that will run in South Carolina Wednesday. Provided to Axios by National Association of Manufacturers

A powerful industry body representing manufacturers is homing in on South Carolina Sen. Tim Scott to crush the confirmation of Scott Garrett — President Trump's nominee to run the Export-Import Bank.

Jay Timmons, who leads the National Association of Manufacturers, told me that his group will launch targeted digital ads Wednesday in South Carolina urging Scott's constituents to call his office and persuade him to pull support from Garrett. The ads are timed to coincide with Garrett's confirmation hearing with the Senate Banking Committee. He faces a razor-tight vote and the White House is watching nervously. Scott is one of the senators who's considering opposing him.

Why this matters: There's been a major ideological fight inside the administration, in the business community, and on Capitol Hill over Garrett's appointment. When he served in Congress, Garrett fought aggressively against the government-backed bank which provides financing to help American businesses compete overseas.

Major corporations like Boeing, who are benefited by Ex-Im, view Garrett as totally unacceptable to run an institution they say they rely on to compete globally.

Conservatives say Garrett is just the man they need to curb the excesses of a bank they consider the worst example of "crony capitalism."

Between the lines: Timmons is one of the most powerful industry leaders in America; he's helping the White House with tax reform and he can leverage the manufacturing angle to appeal to Trump's populist instincts. Timmons told me he doesn't believe — based on Garrett's record in Congress — his attempts to "cast a different image" that he'd be a "reformer" rather than a "destroyer" of the institution.

White House officials have a blunt retort to that argument. They say, 'sure, Garrett tried to shut down the bank but now he'll be working for a president who's ordered him to make it operational.' They also say they needed to nominate a conservative to ensure the votes of hardline senators like Alabama's Richard Shelby.

Timmons is confident Garrett has yet to lock down the votes he needs to get confirmed. And White House officials are privately anxious about where this is heading.

Go deeper

Updated 12 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden, Harris and nearly all the living former presidents and their spouses lay a wreath at Arlington National Cemetery.

Inaugural address: Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 3 hours ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters to disrupt certification of Biden's victory. Trump did not attend Wednesday's ceremony.