J. Scott Applewhite / AP

A majority of Americans on both sides of the aisle are not only unhappy with the current tax system, but they feel that a major tax reform plan needs to pass, according to a new poll from America First Policies given exclusively to Axios.

Why it matters: The survey results suggest that tax reform is "truly a bipartisan concern," said Brian Walsh, president of America First Policies, in the press release. However, the administration hasn't made any bipartisan efforts on their tax reform plan thus far. Instead, Republicans are committed to passing their tax plan via reconciliation, which means it would only need Republican votes in the Senate. And the admin hasn't reached out to any of the 10 red-state Democratic Senators to discuss tax reform, which some veteran Republican operatives have told Axios is political malpractice not to consult with these Senators on the issue.

America First Policies is one of the largest and arguably most influential pro-Trump outside groups. Six of Trump's former campaign aides who helped him get elected started the nonprofit in January as a way to support and advocate for his administration's policies at the grassroots level.

Study higlights:

  • 82% of people polled think tax reform needs to pass
  • A majority of those from each party are unhappy with the current tax system (61% of Democrats, 66% of Independents, and 75% of Republicans)
  • 83% of those polled want a "simpler and fairer" tax system and one that provides relief for families with child and dependent care expenses
  • American manufacturing and job creation were an important issue to an overwhelming majority of the 1,202 registered voters polled in this survey: 84% want the tax code to be modernized "to encourage corporations to stay in America" and 76% want a system that will increase wages and "create nearly 2 million full-time jobs" in the U.S.

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