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A sign encourages visitors at Old Orchard Beach in Maine to wear a mask on July 13. Photo: Shawn Patrick Ouellette/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Black people in Maine account for nearly 23% of coronavirus cases, despite making up about 2% of the state's population, the Washington Post reports.

The big picture: Despite Maine having among the lowest rates of coronavirus infections in the country, the state has followed the national trend of high rates of infections among Black people.

  • Officials said contact tracing indicates many of the infected Black Mainers are immigrants whose jobs leave them vulnerable to the pandemic. Maine does not collect data on coronavirus for immigrants, following federal guidelines.
  • Officials have addressed the issue by offering more testing and health care, finding ways to provide aid directly to immigrant groups and hiring more bilingual staff.

What to watch: "[A]dvocates for immigrants warn that conditions in Maine are ripe for a spike in infections if officials do not reach immigrants directly," the Post's Maria Sacchetti writes.

  • Most of the Black immigrants in Maine are from African nations including Somalia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

Go deeper: Why the coronavirus pandemic is hitting minorities harder

Go deeper

Oct 27, 2020 - Health

Axios-Ipsos poll: Federal response has only gotten worse

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note ±3.3% margin of error for the total sample size; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Americans believe the federal government's handling of the pandemic has gotten significantly worse over time, according to the latest installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: Every other institution measured in Week 29 of our national poll — from state and local governments to people's own employers and area businesses — won positive marks for improving their responses since those panicked early days in March and April.

Nearly two dozen Minnesota COVID cases traced to 3 Trump campaign events

President Trump speaks to a crowd of 2,000 supporters during a rally at the Bemidji Regional Airport on Sept. 18 in Bemidji, Minnesota. Photo by Stephen Maturen via Getty

The Minnesota Department of Health has traced nearly two dozen coronavirus cases to three campaign events held last month, an official told Axios on Monday.

Why it matters: The Trump campaign has come under repeated fire for being lax about mask requirements and not adhering to social distancing and other local guidelines at its events.

Updated Oct 26, 2020 - Health

Fox News president and several hosts advised to quarantine in COVID-19 precaution

A political display is posted on the outside of the Fox News headquarters on 6th Avenue in New York City in July. Photo: Timothy A. Clary/AFP via Getty Images

Fox News president Jay Wallace and anchors Bret Baier and Martha MacCallum are among those recommended to get tested and quarantine after possible exposure to COVID-19, the New York Times first reported Sunday night.

The big picture: The Fox News contingent, which also included "The Five" show hosts Juan Williams and Dana Perino, were on a charter flight from Nashville to New York following Thursday's presidential debate with a person who later tested positive for the coronavirus.