The courthouse in New York where Cesar Sayoc appeared. Photo: Rick Loomis/Getty Images

Cesar Sayoc could face life in prison after being charged in a 30-count indictment that includes five counts of using weapons of mass destruction, five counts of illegal mailing of explosives and five counts of threatening interstate communications, the Washington Post reports.

The backdrop: Sayoc addressed at least 16 possible explosive devices to prominent critics of President Trump including former president Barack Obama, former secretary of state Hillary Clinton, philanthropist billionaire George Soros and John Brennan by way of CNN's New York office.

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Trump tries to set a tax trap for Biden

Photo: Jim Watson/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump is trying to lure Joe Biden into a Walter Mondale trap — attempting to force the Democratic nominee to embrace middle-class tax increases as part of his election strategy.

Why it matters: With his Saturday evening executive action to unilaterally rewrite the tax code, Trump again is demonstrating the lengths to which he’ll go to change the conversation — and try to make the election a choice between him and Biden, and not a referendum on him.

Tech's reluctant road to taking on Trump

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

The coronavirus pandemic, Black Lives Matter protests and a looming election have brought long-simmering conflicts between tech platforms and President Trump to a boil, as Facebook, Twitter and other services are starting to take presidential misinformation seriously.

What's happening: Wary of becoming arbiters of political speech, tech's platforms have carved out a range of exceptions and immunities for Trump and other political leaders — but that accommodation is coming undone.

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The cost of kids losing gym class

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

With a growing number of schools opting for online-only classes this fall to limit the spread of COVID-19, physical education will be severely limited, if not suspended altogether.

Why it matters: While classroom-based learning can be done virtually, it's nearly impossible to replicate physical education — which plays a crucial role in kids' physical and mental health — through a screen. And with sports on hold in most states, PE is the only physical activity outlet some kids have.