Jul 13, 2017

Macron welcomes Trump in Paris ahead of Bastille Day

Michel Euler / AP

French President Macron welcomed Trump to Paris at Les Invalides, the military museum where the tomb of Napoleon lies, ahead of Bastille Day, where they shook hands and took an official photo. Catch videos and images of Trump's arrival and tour:

During a rendition of the Star Spangled Banner, Trump placed his hand over his heart. The band followed with La Marseillais, per the pool.Matthieu Alexandre / AP

The tour: They toured the complex together with their first ladies and appeared to walk leisurely, visiting the tomb of Napoleon. Per the pool, "When POTUS and FLOTUS started walking again, your pooler saw Macron tap his wife on the rear end. She looked surprised and smiled."

While walking in the courtyard, I overheard Macron say something about ISIS on the live Facebook feed, which was inaudible beyond "ISIS emerged..."Matthieu Alexandre / AP

Macron later offered Trump a gift, which appeared to be some kind of book, and when Trump asked if the president had signed it, it was revealed Macron had not yet signed it, so he did. After accepting it, Trump replied it was a "great honor." They shook hands.

Up next: They're headed to the Elysée Palace for a bilateral meeting and a presser. Later they'll dine in the Eiffel Tower.

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George Zimmerman sues Buttigieg and Warren for $265M

George Zimmerman in Sanford, Florida, in November 2013. Photo: Joe Burbank-Pool/Getty Images

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Photo: Mario Tama/Getty Images

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What she's saying: "I wish everyone was as perfect as you, Pete, but let me tell you what it's like to be in the arena. ... I did not one bit agree with these draconian policies to separate kids from their parents, and in my first 100 days, I would immediately change that."