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Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti told CNN's "State of the Union" on Sunday that the city is "on the brink" of needing another stay-at-home order, as new coronavirus cases continue to surge in California and across the U.S.

The state of play: Garcetti said a stay-at-home order would likely come at the state or county level. Los Angeles County reported 2,770 new cases and 37 more deaths on Saturday, bringing its total to 153,041 cases and 4,084 fatalities, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.

What he's saying: Asked by CNN's Jake Tapper about "what went wrong" after California appeared to be in good shape, Garcetti blamed a "lack of national leadership" and said that people became "exhausted" by lockdown restrictions.

  • "They were sold a bill of goods. They said this was under control. They said this would be over soon. And I think when leaders say that, people react. And they do the wrong things. They stop distancing themselves. They stop washing their hands. They stop wearing masks," Garcetti said.
  • "We know this will be a marathon," he continued. "Stop telling people this will be over soon. Let people know that this is a marathon, that we have to kind of push through every single mile. And if we don't come together as a nation with national leadership, we will see more people die."

Go deeper

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Health: Hospital crisis deepens as holiday season nears.
  2. Vaccine: Moderna to file for FDA emergency use authorizationVaccinating rural America won't be easy — Being last in the vaccine queue is young people's next big COVID test.
  3. Politics: Bipartisan group of senators seeks stimulus dealChuck Grassley returns to Senate after recovering from COVID-19.
  4. States: Cuomo orders emergency hospital protocols as COVID capacity dwindles.
  5. Economy: Wall Street wonders how bad economy has to get for Congress to act.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: The state of play of the top vaccines.
Oct 27, 2020 - Health

Axios-Ipsos poll: Federal response has only gotten worse

Data: Axios/Ipsos poll; Note ±3.3% margin of error for the total sample size; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Americans believe the federal government's handling of the pandemic has gotten significantly worse over time, according to the latest installment of the Axios/Ipsos Coronavirus Index.

Why it matters: Every other institution measured in Week 29 of our national poll — from state and local governments to people's own employers and area businesses — won positive marks for improving their responses since those panicked early days in March and April.

Caitlin Owens, author of Vitals
Oct 27, 2020 - Health

The coronavirus is starting to crush some hospitals

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Some states are seeing dangerous levels of coronavirus hospitalizations, with hospitals warning that they could soon become overwhelmed if no action is taken to slow the spread.

Why it matters: Patients can only receive good care if there's enough care to go around — which is one reason why the death rate was so much higher in the spring, some experts say.