Photo: John Lamparski/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

French cosmetics company L'Oreal announced Saturday that it will remove words such as "whitening" from its skin care products, AFP reports.

Why it matters: The change comes as protests over racism continue around the world in the wake of George Floyd's killing, forcing companies to actively reconsider the products they sell and how they sell them.

What they're saying: The corporate giant said in a statement Saturday that it “has decided to remove the words white/whitening, fair/fairness, light/lightening from all its skin evening products.”

  • Unilever announced Thursday it plans to rename its "Fair & Lovely" skin lightening cream. The company said it will also drop the word "Fair" in its name.

Go deeper: Quaker to rename Aunt Jemima products, says brand is based on "a racial stereotype"

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2 mins ago - Sports

The NBA's YouTube generation documents life in Orlando bubble

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

The NBA bubble at Walt Disney World demands a documentary and will surely get its own "30 for 30" one day. But as the action begins to unfolds, it's clear that the players, themselves, will be the primary storytellers.

Why it matters: The most unique sporting event in history (just ahead of every other event this year) will be documented by its participants, making it less of a traditional "sports season" and more of a must-see reality show.

PPP was not enough for small businesses

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) has left much to be desired for needy small businesses around the U.S., and the overwhelming majority of recipients are about to exhaust their funding and may start laying off employees.

Why it matters: The PPP has been derided by some economists and researchers as inefficient and ineffective, but a new Goldman Sachs survey shows that even for the businesses and employees it helped, it has not been enough.

Updated 2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Supreme Court clears way for first federal execution since 2003

Lethal injection facility in San Quentin, California. Photo: California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation via Getty Images

The Supreme Court ruled early Tuesday that federal executions can resume, reversing a lower court decision and paving the way for the first lethal injection since 2003 to take place at a federal prison in Indiana, AP reports.

The big picture: A lower court had delayed the execution, saying inmates had provided evidence the government's plan to carry out executions using lethal injections "poses an unconstitutionally significant risk of serious pain."