Dec 2, 2021 - Food and Drink

Fermenting food at home is becoming more popular

A ruby sauerkraut in the making. Photo: Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images
A ruby sauerkraut in the making. Photo: Cyrus McCrimmon/The Denver Post via Getty Images

Gabe Toth started fermenting in his home kitchen. First, home-brewed beer. Then, pickles. Now, anything.

What's new: He's the author of the book, "The Fermentation Kitchen" from Boulder-based Brewers Publications ,a how-to guide to make bread, cheese, vinegar, kombucha and other fermented foods.

  • "I like making things and I love the transformation that ingredients undergo," he tells Axios.

Why it matters: The fermented food and ingredient market is projected to top $689 billion by 2023, according to a trade group.

  • The popularity is evident in kimchi and other sauerkraut items available at grocery stores.
  • "The fermented foods world has changed dramatically in the last 10 to 15 years," he says.

Pro tip: The easiest entry point is pickles, he advises. You don't need to start with cucumbers, but plenty of other vegetables will work. Once there, try soft cheeses, he suggests.

This story first appeared in the Axios Denver newsletter, designed to help readers get smarter, faster on the most consequential news unfolding in their own backyard.

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