Apr 9, 2024 - News

A total eclipse of our hearts

A sliver of the sun behind the moon

The view from Arlington. Photo: Courtesy of Joseph Andaya

Clouds still covered much of the North Texas sky less than 30 minutes before the Moon was expected to totally eclipse the Sun.

  • One man at White Rock Lake exclaimed, "Come on, Delkus. Deliver!" By totality, the clouds had passed and the ring of fire was fully visible.

Why it matters: Texas won't be in the path of totality for a total solar eclipse again until 2045, and that path will include just a small slice of the Panhandle, according to NASA.

  • As many as 1 million people traveled to Texas to watch yesterday's full eclipse.

Driving the news: The clouds were low and thick early in the day, beginning to clear somewhat by noon.

  • Clouds continued to pass over the Sun, occasionally blocking the partial view seen through eclipse glasses.
  • But by about 1:40pm — as many parts of Dallas-Fort Worth experienced totality — the clouds had cleared.

Zoom out: In Rochester, New York, another popular destination for the eclipse, heavy cloud cover made it almost impossible for crowds to see the Sun. But even without the direct view, the eclipse above the clouds momentarily made day seem like night.

Flashback: Morning clouds in 1878, the last time Texas experienced a total solar eclipse, carried similar uncertainty about its visibility.

  • But, at 3pm, "the heavens were clear" around the Sun and "joy was manifest" as the Earth cooled and the sky darkened, the Fort Worth Daily Democrat wrote.

What's next: The next total solar eclipse will occur from Greenland to Spain on Aug. 12, 2026.

  • The best chance to see another total solar eclipse in the U.S. is Aug. 12, 2045.
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