Jun 12, 2015 - News

Mailbag: June 12, end of week 9

mailbag-charlotte-agenda early june

mailbag-charlotte-agenda early june

This is part of an ongoing series titled Mailbag, items readers submit via our feedback form (not social media, everybody already sees that). We get a ton of feedback, this is not close to everything (it’s about 4%), but it’s a good sample.

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General Feedback

“I may have found one error for you though: there is also a massively huge Eskimo on the top of the DQ on Wilkinson Blvd to the west of town. An incredibly minor thing on the surface–I mean, who cares?–but to not know it’s even there is really sadly indicative of most of your readership, I imagine. Charlotte is one of the most de-facto segregated cities in the country. I’m guessing 90% of your readers come from the southern wedge between I-77 and Independence, with pockets in Plaza Midwood, NoDa, etc. Most of them probably don’t even know there’s a DQ over there (in spite of the 10 foot Eskimo on the roof) or never drive down Wilkinson unless it’s to the airport to fly out somewhere. I just can’t help but wonder how our city might improve if our affluent might occasionally leave their bubble.” – A
Ted: True on the bubble, we hope to attack this over time. And yes, I messed up on the DQ Eskimo location.

“Are you sure about that DQ in Plaza Midwood? I think it was built in 1951. I drive out to the airport quite a bit, and sometimes go down Wilkinson. There’s a DQ there too with an Eskimo. So that got me wondering about your statement. The one on Wilkinson was built in 1947.” – V
Ted: Love the research, you’re right. I was wrong.

“I’m LOVING reading every, single thing you guys put out each day…..SOOOO interesting and that’s a huge feat since I don’t read very often!! Hahahah!! You guys are making me SMARTER!!” – S

“I get your updates every morning and I enjoy them and the work you do. But I wonder: can you lay off the word “lame,”‘which is used with regular frequency in your emails? Here’s why. I’m an English professor. What I teach is disability studies, a field that looks at how the representation of disability & illness in literature and art and popular culture has shaped our ideas about disabled people. I’ve curated three art exhibitions that invite people to re-see disability as an identity, not just a problem. Language shapes our reality. Calling things “lame” reinforces the idea that lame things are bad. Including lame bodies. I’m sure you don’t intend this. You may even disagree or see my point as political correctness run amok. But I hope, rather, you might see it as a friendly suggestion by a disability ally & activist, one that will make your emails more welcoming to disabled Charlotteans. Just a thought.” – A

“Hi! I was super excited to find this website after seeing someone share it on FB. I love Charlotte and I love keeping up with the exciting new things happening to our city. I have been a homeowner in the Oakhurst neighborhood for 12 years and have been waiting for my little diamond in the rough to start to shine and it’s finally happening!! So exciting!!” – E

“I’m one of Axios Charlotte’s biggest fans. Every time we get a new group of young workers in town I immediately point them to your website. You guys give us a connection to the city and an easy way to find fun things to do (when we get the rare chance). It’s with all that in mind that I write you concerned about some of the things I’ve read recently. To get right to it- Axios Charlotte bashed Franklin Graham stating he’s ‘on the wrong side of history’ and wrote a glowing review of the pro-Islam efforts happening in Charlotte, all within the same week. I read Axios Charlotte and recommend it to others because I find it extremely useful and entertaining. I also think it provides a service to the community. I do not think it is the appropriate platform to promote certain religions and attack others. You and I may disagree about whether or not this has occurred but I will say that I’m paying special attention to the topics of articles in the future. I sincerely hope that this does not become a hindrance to my enthusiasm about your group’s work in the future.” – A

“I was hanging with my friend in the Ashton in Southend (super luxury building) that is literally two blocks from the new Publix. We wanted to grab some grub, so he said…let’s hop in my car. I was like, what?? He said, ‘yea…the path along the light rail line is on the opposite side of the tracks…there’s no way to cross the tracks to get to Publix.’ (of course we could have walked the long way around down South Blvd, but who’s counting?) Which got me thinking. There is a LONG a** swath of tracks from the Ashton down to the next stop south (forgot name) …and each side of the tracks are literally cut off from each other. With urban infill and businesses filling in, isn’t it counterintuitive to not have somewhere for pedestrians to be able to cross mid tracks. Even up and over somehow. Just a thought”. – J
Ted: Good thought. Story in the works on this.

“Any word on brand name street level coming to Uptown? The area is blooming well…only void is street level retail. Folks should not have to get in their car and drive to the mall to shop. Retail will lure more businesses and folks to work and play in the area. Uptown needs street level retail and family style restaurants such as upscale nail salon, Victoria’s Secret, The Gap, Foot Locker, MAC Cosmetics, H&M, Zara, Gucci, Ferragamo Shoes, Home Goods, Hallmark, Godiva, Shake Shack, California Kitchen Pizza and Bone Fish Grill. Or, a retail complex similar to Downtown Silver Spring. Such additions will make Uptown a hot spot and attract visitors. Hoping developers will seek a variety of brand name retailers to fill this void.” – A

“CA was very meaty today. That is a big compliment.” – My Mom

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In response to Inside the Robinson-Spangler Carolina Room at Main Library Uptown

“Good writing, Katie! I know the feeling of standing mouth agape as the reality of the past jumps off the page, but I haven’t seen it captured so well before. I’m glad you love our space and our collection. Next time, I won’t assume that young working people can’t be interested in genealogy.” – T (a librarian)

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In response to Charlotte woman shares her abortion experience and reaction to NC HB 465

“I sympathize with the anonymous author of the abortion story you published, but the takeaway was essentially that abortion clinics are dirty, and there are people outside who want to change your mind about what you’re about to do. She had no commentary on the deadly consequence of the act in question, or the value she hoped to gain by terminating her pregnancy (AKA, her baby), or a remotely convincing argument against consulting a medical professional and taking 3 more days to consider such a (likely) traumatic and (definitely) life-changing decision. It came off as frivolous. The story such as it was certainly reveals an editorial stance by Axios Charlotte. I say this to you because so far I’ve quite enjoyed your other stories, but if I noticed this about the abortion story, a number of your other readers did, as well. I promise there are a lot of young professionals in our town who like reading about new restaurants and local businesses who are more diverse in their moral and political views than you may realize. I don’t take you for the kind of publication that wants to alienate potential fans.” – M

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