Dec 8, 2017

U.S. liquified natural gas export capacity is growing

Data: Energy Information Administration; Chart: Axios Visuals

The Energy Information Administration is out with a helpful primer on the growth of U.S liquefied natural gas export infrastructure, and when various projects are expected to come online.

Why it matters: The sharp growth is one result of the fracking-enabled production surge that's helping to transform the U.S into a prominent LNG exporter, in addition to already boosting the share of natural gas in U.S. power generation at coal's expense.

  • Go deeper: Yesterday the Houston Chronicle published a detailed feature about the growth of U.S. LNG projects, concluding that the U.S. is at a "tipping point."
  • They note: "The Energy Department projects that LNG production capacity will quadruple by the end of 2019, making the nation the largest source of LNG after Qatar and Australia. The International Energy Agency predicts the U.S. could vault to first within a decade."

Go deeper

The decade that blew up energy predictions

Illustration: Andrew Witherspoon / Axios

America’s energy sources, like booming oil and crumbling coal, have defied projections and historical precedents over the last decade.

Why it matters: It shows how change can happen rapidly and unexpectedly, even in an industry known to move gradually and predictably. With a new decade upon us, let’s look back at the last one’s biggest, most surprising energy changes.

Go deeperArrowDec 23, 2019

Oil industry predicts "severe consequences" if U.S. bans fracking

The oil industry and its backers are coming out swinging against proposals pushed by Democratic presidential candidates aiming to virtually eliminate oil and gas.

Why it matters: The emphasis, made at an annual luncheon attended by hundreds of energy executives, shows how worried the industry is about the potential impact of such proposals, including fracking bans.

Go deeperArrowJan 7, 2020

Trump announces rule changes to exempt big projects from environmental review

Photo: Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images

President Trump on Thursday announced that his administration is vastly narrowing the scope of a 50-year-old law governing environmental reviews of large infrastructure and energy projects.

Why it matters: The proposed changes to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) will make the process to review big-ticket fossil-fuel projects like the Keystone XL Pipeline easier and faster, while also excluding consideration of climate change.

Go deeperArrowJan 9, 2020