Jun 10, 2018

Lindsey Graham: "I'm not so sure most Americans" are pro-free trade

Sen. Lindsey Graham told ABC's "This Week" on Sunday that he agrees with Sen. John McCain's views on free trade and globalization — but that he's not sure the majority of Americans do.

The backdrop: In response to President Trump's decision not to sign the G-7 joint communique, McCain tweeted a reassurance to U.S. allies that " bipartisan majorities of Americans remain pro-free trade, pro-globalization & supportive of alliances based on 70 years of shared values."

Graham's full quote...

"The Bernie Sanders element of the Democratic Party doesn't stand for free trade. Hillary Clinton said she would get out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership if she had become president. There's a movement in our party that Trump sees that got him the nomination and eventually become President of the United States. I'm not so sure a majority of Americans believe that globalization and free trade is in our interests. I believe that. John McCain believes it. 
The reason we're having problems here at home, Brexit, Italy. There's a movement all over the world to look inward, not outward. And I think it's a mistake, but I'm not so sure most Americans agree with John McCain and Lindsey Graham."

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