Oct 18, 2019

What I'm driving: A look at the 2020 Lincoln Aviator

My favorite view of the Lincoln Aviator

My latest ride is the 2020 Lincoln Aviator, the luxury brand's first midsize three-row SUV.

The big picture: Lincoln is making an impressive comeback, with a fresh lineup of new models that emphasize what it calls "effortless luxury."

It's not trying to match European carmakers on performance. Instead, it's successfully carving out its own niche as a stress-free oasis.

  • One example: The 30-way power adjustable heated and cooled front seats come with a relaxing massage feature for your back, hips and thighs.

Details: You can get the Aviator with a smooth 400-horsepower twin-turbo V-6 or opt for the Grand Touring model, a plug-in hybrid.

  • I drove both, but preferred the gasoline version over the plug-in hybrid, which felt sluggish dragging around an additional 800 pounds.
  • Convenient new technology lets you use your phone as a key to unlock or start the vehicle without a traditional key.
  • An adaptive suspension uses a forward-facing camera to spot potholes or speed bumps, adjusting the ride as necessary.
  • Lincoln's CoPilot 360 driver-assistance feature comes standard with lane-keeping, blindspot monitoring, forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking and automatic high beams.
  • If you upgrade to CoPilot 360 Plus you get adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go traffic jam assist, lane-centering technology and an automatic parking feature, among other technologies.

The bottom line: The Aviator, which ranges from $51,100 to $87,800, is a great ride for the well-to-do family.

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