My favorite view of the Lincoln Aviator

My latest ride is the 2020 Lincoln Aviator, the luxury brand's first midsize three-row SUV.

The big picture: Lincoln is making an impressive comeback, with a fresh lineup of new models that emphasize what it calls "effortless luxury."

It's not trying to match European carmakers on performance. Instead, it's successfully carving out its own niche as a stress-free oasis.

  • One example: The 30-way power adjustable heated and cooled front seats come with a relaxing massage feature for your back, hips and thighs.

Details: You can get the Aviator with a smooth 400-horsepower twin-turbo V-6 or opt for the Grand Touring model, a plug-in hybrid.

  • I drove both, but preferred the gasoline version over the plug-in hybrid, which felt sluggish dragging around an additional 800 pounds.
  • Convenient new technology lets you use your phone as a key to unlock or start the vehicle without a traditional key.
  • An adaptive suspension uses a forward-facing camera to spot potholes or speed bumps, adjusting the ride as necessary.
  • Lincoln's CoPilot 360 driver-assistance feature comes standard with lane-keeping, blindspot monitoring, forward collision warning, automatic emergency braking and automatic high beams.
  • If you upgrade to CoPilot 360 Plus you get adaptive cruise control with stop-and-go traffic jam assist, lane-centering technology and an automatic parking feature, among other technologies.

The bottom line: The Aviator, which ranges from $51,100 to $87,800, is a great ride for the well-to-do family.

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Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

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Harris: "Women are going to be a priority" in Biden administration

Sen. Kamala Harris at an event in Wilmington, Del. Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

In her first sit-down interview since being named Joe Biden's running mate, Sen. Kamala Harris talked about what she'll do to fight for women if elected VP, and how the Democrats are thinking about voter turnout strategies ahead of November.

What they're saying: "In a Biden-Harris administration women are going to be a priority, understanding that women have many priorities and all of them must be acknowledged," Harris told The 19th*'s Errin Haines-Whack.

Facebook goes after Apple

Illustration: Lazaro Gamio/Axios

Facebook is seeking to force a face-off with Apple over its 30% in-app purchase commission fee, which Facebook suggests hurts small businesses struggling to get by during the pandemic.

The big picture: Facebook has never publicly gone after Apple, a key strategic partner, this aggressively. Both companies face antitrust scrutiny, which in Apple's case has centered on the very fee structure Facebook is now attacking.