Mar 27, 2018

Former boss of Larry Nassar hit with criminal sexual conduct charge

Larry Nassar. Photo: Jeff Kowalsky / AFP / Getty Images

Former Dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine at Michigan State University, William Strampel, has been charged criminal sexual conduct, along with one felony count of misconduct in office and two other misdemeanor charges, CNN reports citing court documents.

Why it matters: Strampel was Larry Nassar's boss at the university and dismissed a complaint in 2014 from one of Nassar's victims, issuing "new guidelines" for Nassar, but not enforcing them nor informed the university's health team about them, per CNN. Nassar abused more than 200 victims during his time as MSU and USA gymnastics doctor, until his arrest in 2016.

The details: CNN reports that Strampel's charges include a "felony count of misconduct in office," a "fourth-degree criminal sexual conduct" charge, and "two charges of willful neglect of duty."

  • Strampel had a video of Nassar performing his "treatment" on a female patient on his computer, along with other pornographic videos and photos, many of them appearing "to be selfies of female MSU students."
  • He is set to be arraigned Tuesday afternoon, though he is still a tenured MSU professor, a title that could take up to a year to be revoked, CNN reports. He cited "health problems" after resigning as dean in December.

Go deeper

The biggest crisis since 1968

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios. Photo: Bettmann/Contributor

The year 1968 has been on a lot of people’s minds lately — another year of protests, violence and upheaval that seemed to be tearing the nation apart.

Yes, but: This crisis also has moments we’ve never seen before — and some historians and experts say the differences suggest that 2020 doesn't compare well at all.

SoftBank to launch $100M fund backing companies led by people of color

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

SoftBank COO Marcelo Claure said in a letter to employees early Wednesday that the firm will create a $100 million fund that "will only invest in companies led by founders and entrepreneurs of color."

Why it matters: The Opportunity Growth Fund is one of the first to put significant capital behind companies' statements of empathy and outrage in response to protests over systemic racism in the U.S. typified by the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and other African Americans by police.

Coronavirus hospitalizations keep falling

Data: COVID Tracking Project, Harvard Global Health Institute; Note: Alabama, Florida, Hawaii, Idaho, Kansas, Nebraska, Tennessee and Puerto Rico have not reported hospitalizations consistently. Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

The number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 continues to decline, particularly in New York and other northeastern states that were among the hardest hit by the virus.

Yes, but: Some states are still recording stagnant or rising amounts of hospitalizations.