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Kushner's clearance stalled by information being investigated by DOJ

Jared Kushner.
Photo: Alex Wong / Getty Images

Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein warned the White House two weeks ago that "significant information requiring additional investigation" would create an additional setback in the security clearance process of senior advisor Jared Kushner, the Washington Post reports.

Why it matters: The situation surrounding former White House aide Rob Porter and his security clearance has called into question other officials who are operating on an interim clearance, Kushner among them. According to the Post, Rosenstein "did not provide any details to the White House" about the information that needs further scrutiny.

One more thing: President Trump said Friday he would let his chief of staff John Kelly call the shots regarding Kushner's clearance. Meanwhile, the Post reports that Kelly has told associates he is "uncomfortable with Kushner's uncertain security clearance status" and wouldn't mind if Kushner and Ivanka "left their positions as full-time employees."

Kushner's lawer, Abbe Lowell, did not immediately respond to Axios' request for comment.

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Zuckerberg admits Facebook "breach of trust"

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg walks wearing a t-shirt, with trees behind him
Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Mark Zuckerberg weighed in on what he called the "Cambridge Analytica situation" today in a Facebook post, saying there was a "a breach of trust between Facebook and the people who share their data with us and expect us to protect it. We need to fix that."

Why it matters: Facebook has been under extraordinary pressure from lawmakers, regulators and Wall Street to respond to the issue.

Haley Britzky 5 hours ago
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Authorities find "confession" from Austin bombing suspect

Police and FBI Agents investigate at the Sunset Valley FedEx store in Austin, Texas, which is linked to the package bomb.
Police and FBI Agents investigate at the Sunset Valley FedEx store in Austin, Texas, which is linked to the package bomb. Photo: Suzanne Cordeiro / AFP / Getty Images

Brian Manley, interim police chief in Austin, Texas, said on Wednesday that authorities found "a 25-minute 'confession'" on Mark Conditt's phone, the Austin bombing suspect, per the Washington Post.

The details: Per Manley, Conditt did not mention terrorism or hatred as his motivation; the phone recording seemed to be "the outcry of a very challenged young man, talking about challenges in his personal life, that led him to this point." Conditt also mentioned all known explosive devices, per the Post.