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Kim Kardashian West. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Kim Kardashian West used her social media prowess on Saturday to urge Texas Gov. Gregg Abbott to halt a death row inmate’s scheduled execution.

"Please @GovAbott How can you execute a man when since his trial, substantial evidence that would exonerate Rodney Reed has come forward and even implicate the other person of interest. I URGE YOU TO DO THE RIGHT THING."
— Kim Kardashian West

Why it matters: Kardashian, one of the world's most recognizable reality TV stars, has the influence to propel cases into the national spotlight. She has 62 million Twitter followers, and has used her show, "Keeping up with the Kardashians," to highlight some of the cases she's supported, such as the case of Alice Marie Johnson.

  • She's previously spoken about the criminal justice system with President Trump, and has helped commute other inmates' sentences.

Context: Kardashian is now advocating on behalf of Rodney Reed, who has been in prison for 21 years for murder.

  • Since his initial trial, DNA evidence associated with the murder weapon has emerged, exonerating Reed from the crime, according to the Innocence Project. His execution date is set for Nov. 20.

Go deeper

Ben Geman, author of Generate
46 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Biden to sign major climate orders, setting up clash with oil industry

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

President Biden will sign new executive actions today that provide the clearest signs yet of his climate plans — elevating the issue to a national security priority and kicking off an intense battle with the oil industry,

Driving the news: One move will freeze issuance of new oil-and-gas leases on public lands and waters "to the extent possible," per a White House summary.

The rebellion against Silicon Valley (the place)

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Smith Collection/Gado via Getty Images

Silicon Valley may be a "state of mind," but it's also very much a real enclave in Northern California. Now, a growing faction of the tech industry is boycotting it.

Why it matters: The Bay Area is facing for the first time the prospect of losing its crown as the top destination for tech workers and startups — which could have an economic impact on the region and force it to reckon with its local issues.

Erica Pandey, author of @Work
4 hours ago - Economy & Business

Telework's tax mess

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

As teleworkers flit from city to city, they're creating a huge tax mess.

Why it matters: Our tax laws aren't built for telecommuting, and this new way of working could have dire implications for city and state budgets.