Dec 28, 2018

Facebook says Kenneth Chenault's role on board will not change

Photo: Earl Gibson III/WireImage via Getty Images

Former American Express chairman and CEO Kenneth Chenault will remain on the board of Facebook without any change in his role, a spokesperson confirmed to Axios.

Why it matters: Chenault will be retiring from the boards of IBM and Procter & Gamble on Feb. 13, the Wall Street Journal reported on Thursday. His departure from the P&G and IBM boards had sparked speculation he would become Facebook’s chairman, a role currently occupied by founder Mark Zuckerberg. He became Facebook's first black board member in February after retiring from AmEx, where he was the third black CEO in Fortune 500 history.

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A new American coronavirus consensus

A hospital tent city rose in Central Park this week. Photo: Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Something surprising is unfolding amid the finger-pointing and war-gaming about the coronavirus threat to America: A general consensus is forming about the next 60 days of wait and pain.

Why it matters: America has a chance to return to some semblance of normal in late May or June, gradually and perhaps geographically, but anything extending beyond that would still be too catastrophic to consider.

Go deeperArrow53 mins ago - Health

Florida's slow response may have made its coronavirus outbreak worse

Data: The Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins, Florida Department of Health; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Florida's slow response to the coronavirus may have set the stage for a disastrous outcome in one of the country's most vulnerable states.

Driving the news: Gov. Ron DeSantis issued a statewide stay-at-home order yesterday, but there's bipartisan concern that he held off too long, letting the virus spread too far, before finally taking steps that many other governors embraced weeks ago.

Go deeperArrowUpdated 2 hours ago - Health

Increase in domestic violence feared during virus lockdown

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

Experts are convinced we are on the precipice of a crisis of domestic violence fueled by the anxiety, stay-at-home rules and economic uncertainty caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

The big picture: There is already early evidence of increased intensity of abuse of people in unhealthy relationships. But given that many are unlikely to seek help until things are more stable — either by calling hotlines or by leaving for shelters — we likely won’t know the full extent of the abuse until the virus outbreak subsides.

Go deeperArrow2 hours ago - Health