Kellyanne Conway gives an interview. Photo: Carolyn Kaster / AP

Fred Shapiro, an associate director at the Yale Law School has updated the"The Yale Book of Quotations," first published in 2006, and the top quote of the year is Kellyanne Conway's "alternative facts" statment on Jan. 22. Shapiro chooses quotes that are famous or revealing of the spirit of the times — not necessarily eloquent or admirable.

"I actually had to limit the amount of Trump-related quotations on the list so as not to have the list overwhelmed by him," Shapiro told the AP.

  1. "Sean Spicer, our press secretary, gave alternative facts." — Kellyanne Conway on "Meet the Press," Jan. 22.
  2. "Alternative facts are not facts. They're falsehoods." — Chuck Todd to Kellyanne Conway, same show.
  3. "I just fired the head of the FBI. He was crazy, a real nut job. I faced great pressure because of Russia. That's taken off." — Trump, as reported by the N.Y. Times, explaining the firing of FBI Director James to visiting Russian officials, May 10.
  4. "With respect to any women who have made allegations on the record, Mr. Weinstein believes that all of these relationships were consensual." — Sallie Hofmeister, spokeswoman for Harvey Weinstein, Oct. 10.
  5. "Make our planet great again." — Emmanuel Macron, statement on the U.S. withdrawal from the Paris climate agreement, June 1.
  6. "We can't have the inmates running the prison." — Robert McNair, owner of the Houston Texans, on NFL players protesting the national anthem, in ESPN The Magazine, Oct. 27.
  7. "Yes." — Elizabeth Warren, responding to Jake Tapper'squestion on whether the 2016 Democratic primaries were rigged in favor of Hillary Clinton, on CNN's "The Lead," Nov. 2.
  8. "And the Academy Award ... for Best Picture ... La La Land." — Warren Beatty and Faye Dunaway, mistakenly reading the wrong winner for Best Picture in an envelope mix-up, Academy Awards, Feb. 27.
  9. "It's a shame the White House has become an adult day care center." — Sen. Bob Corker (R-Tenn.), in a tweet, Oct. 8.
  10. "There is too much money in the world." — Lawrence Luhring, art dealer, reacting to the sale of a painting possibly by Leonardo da Vinci for over $450 million, as quoted in the N.Y. Times, Nov. 16.

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In photos: Thousands evacuated as Southern California fire grows

A plane makes a retardant drop on a ridge at the Apple Fire north of Banning in Riverside County, which "doubled in size" Saturday, per KTLA. Robert Gauthier / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A massive wildfire that prompted mandatory evacuations in Southern California over the weekend burned 26,450 acres and was 5% contained by Monday afternoon, the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection said.

The big picture: As California remains an epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the U.S., some 15 separate fires are raging across the state. About 7,800 people were under evacuation orders from the Apple Fire, about 75 miles east of Los Angeles, as hundreds of firefighters battled the blaze. CalFire said Monday that a malfunction involving a "diesel-fueled vehicle emitting burning carbon from the exhaust system" started the Apple Fire.

Updated 55 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 18,178,736 — Total deaths: 691,111 — Total recoveries — 10,835,789Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 7 p.m. ET: 4,698,335 — Total deaths: 155,331 — Total recoveries: 1,468,689 — Total tests: 57,543,852Map.
  3. Politics: White House will require staff to undergo randomized coronavirus testing — Pelosi says Birx "enabled" Trump on misinformation.
  4. Sports: 13 members of St. Louis Cardinals test positive, prompting MLB to cancel Tigers series — Former FDA chief says MLB outbreaks should be warning sign for schools.
  5. 1 🎥 thing: "Tenet" may be the first major film to get a global pandemic release.

Twitter faces FTC fine of up to $250 million over alleged privacy violations

Photo: Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket

The Federal Trade Commission has accused Twitter of using phone numbers and emails from its users to make targeted ads between 2013 and 2019, Twitter said in an SEC filing published Monday.

Why it matters: Twitter estimates that the FTC's draft complaint, which was sent a few days after its Q2 earnings report, could cost the company between $150 million and $250 million. The complaint is unrelated to the recent Twitter hack involving a bitcoin scam.