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Photo: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

White House Press Secretary Kayleigh McEnany announced Monday that she tested positive for coronavirus.

Why it matters: She is the latest member of President Trump's inner circle to be diagnosed with the illness over the last few days.

  • McEnany said that she is "experiencing no symptoms" in her announcement.
  • She added that "no reporters, producers or members of the press are listed as close contacts by the White House Medical Unit."

Between the lines: McEnany's positive test underscores a unique challenge for the White House as it battles its ongoing coronavirus outbreak because it may take days for people to test positive.

  • White House aides have faced days with no internal communication from Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows about virus protocols and procedures — including whether they should show up to work.

The big picture: Her announcement comes as Trump remains hospitalized due to coronavirus complications.

Worth noting: McEnany did not wear a mask while speaking to reporters as recently as Sunday. Administration officials have continually downplayed the use of masks throughout the pandemic.

What she's saying: "As an essential worker, I have worked diligently to provide needed information to the American people at this time. With my recent positive test, I will begin the quarantine process and will continue working on behalf of the American people remotely," she wrote on Twitter.

White House Correspondents' Association President Zeke Miller said in a statement:

“We wish Kayleigh, the president and everyone else struggling with the virus a swift recovery. As of this moment we are not aware of additional cases among White House journalists, though we know some are awaiting test results. We strongly encourage our members to continue following CDC guidance on mask-wearing and distancing — especially when at the White House — and urge journalists to seek testing if they were potentially exposed.”

Go deeper

Jan 12, 2021 - Health

Scoop: The Trump administration's plan to speed up vaccinations

Illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios

The Trump administration is set to deliver new guidelines today that will get coronavirus vaccinations moving much faster.

Driving the news: New federal guidelines will recommend opening up the process to everyone older than 65, and will also aim to move doses out the door rather than holding some back.

Updated Jan 12, 2021 - Health

Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine expected to provide immunity for at least 1 year

Photo: Mario Tama via Getty

Moderna's coronavirus vaccine will provide immunity from the disease for at least one year, the biotech company said Monday per Reuters.

Why it matters: Moderna's vaccine is one of two now authorized for emergency use in the U.S., as coronavirus cases surge past 22.5 million nationally and 90.8 million globally.

Members of Congress must pass through metal detectors to access House floor

U.S. Capitol Police installing a metal detector outside the doors of the House of Representatives on Jan. 12. Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Members of the House of Representatives must now pass through metal detectors before entering the chamber, according to a memo from acting House Sergeant at Arms Timothy Blodgett.

Why it matters: Previously, members were able to enter the chamber without any security screening. The unprecedented measures comes less than a week after the violent assault on the Capitol building by a pro-Trump mob and as some GOP House freshmen have inquired about carrying guns into the Capitol.