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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was silent for about 20 seconds when asked to react to Monday's scenes from outside the White House, where police officers forcefully removed peaceful protesters to make way for a Trump photo op in front of St. John's Church.

What he's saying: "We all watch in horror and consternation at what is going on in the United States," Trudeau said after the long pause, declining to specifically react to Trump's threat to deploy the military on U.S. soil.

  • "It is a time to pull people together, but it is a time to listen. It is a time to learn, when injustices continue despite progress over years and decades."
  • Trudeau then highlighted Canada's own challenges with racism and discrimination, saying black Canadians face many of the same hardships as African Americans.

The big picture: The international community is watching as the Trump administration looks to crack down on U.S. protests that followed the killing of George Floyd as they continue for the eighth consecutive day.

  • Australian Prime Minister Scott Morrison called for an investigation on Tuesday after video appeared to show two Australian journalists being attacked by police officers during protests outside the White House.
  • German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said his government would question U.S. officials after a reporter with German public outlet Deutsche Welle said he was shot at live on air while reporting in Minneapolis.
  • “Democratic countries must apply the highest standards in protecting press freedom. In this context, all violence must not only be criticized by also prosecuted and clarified so that journalists can be effectively protected while carrying out their work,” Haas said.

Go deeper: More reactions to the protests from around the world

Go deeper

Updated Oct 1, 2020 - Politics & Policy

The major police reforms enacted since George Floyd's death

Federal officers in Portland, Oregon on July 21. Photo: Nathan Howard/Getty Images

Nationwide Black Lives Matter protests sparked by George Floyd's killing have put new pressure on states and cities to scale back the force that officers can use on civilians.

Why it matters: Police reforms of this scale have not taken place since the inception of the Black Lives Matter movement in 2013, following George Zimmerman's acquittal for shooting Trayvon Martin, an unarmed Black teenager.

2 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Inhofe loudly sets Trump straight on defense bill

Sen. Jim Inhofe speaks with reporters in the Capitol last month. Photo: Samuel Corum/Getty Images

Senator Jim Inhofe told President Trump today he'll likely fail to get two big wishes in pending defense spending legislation, bellowing into his cellphone: "This is the only chance to get our bill passed," a source who overheard part of their conversation tells Axios.

Why it matters: Republicans are ready to test whether Trump's threats of vetoing the bill, which has passed every year for more than half a century, are empty.

Conspiracy theories blow back on Trump's White House

Sidney Powell. Photo: Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

President Trump has rarely met a conspiracy theory he doesn't like, but he and other Republicans now worry the wild tales told by lawyers Sidney Powell and Lin Wood may cost them in Georgia's Senate special elections.

Why it matters: The two are telling Georgians not to vote for Republicans David Perdue and Kelly Loeffler because of a bizarre, baseless and potentially self-defeating theory: It's not worth voting because the Chinese Communist Party has rigged the voting machines.