Markus Schreiber / AP

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at CERAweek energy conference last night:

  • He talked up oil sands and the environment. Trudeau backs the Keystone XL and other export pipelines to help bring Alberta's massive oil sands resources to market (even as some oil majors turn away from the carbon-heavy fuels). "No country would find 173 billion barrels of oil in the ground and just leave them there," he said. "The resource will be developed. Our job is to ensure that this is done responsibly, safely, and sustainably." But Trudeau also spent plenty of time talking up his climate change initiatives, which include carbon pricing.
  • He also attacked the border adjustment tax: Trudeau offered a warning about imposing new trade restrictions. "Anything that creates impediments at the border, extra tariffs or new taxes is something we are concerned with," he said, warning of harm to the Canadian and U.S. economies. He made clear that he opposes the border adjustment tax idea specifically, and then urged the audience: "You can applaud against the border adjustment tax." They did.

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Updated 48 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Global: Total confirmed cases as of 8 a.m. ET: 33,396,784 — Total deaths: 1,002,628 — Total recoveries: 23,182,295Map.
  2. U.S.: Total confirmed cases as of 8 a.m. ET: 7,150,117 — Total deaths: 205,091 — Total recoveries: 2,794,608 — Total tests: 102,342,416Map.
  3. Business: Companies are still holding back earnings guidance.
  4. Health: Trump announces plan to distribute 150 million rapid tests —The childless vaccine.
  5. Media: Fauci: Some of what Fox News reports about COVID-19 is "outlandish"
  6. States: Cuomo extends New York moratorium on evictions until 2021.
  7. World: More than 1 million people have now died from coronavirus — India the second country after U.S. to hit 6 million cases.

Media prepares to fact check debates in real time

Illustration: Annelise Capossela/Axios

From live blogs to video chyrons and tweets, media companies are introducing new ways to fact check the presidential debates in real time this year.

Between the lines: The debates themselves are likely to leave less room for live fact-checking from moderators than a traditional news interview would.