Aug 2, 2017

Just three stocks have pushed the Dow over 22,000

AP

Of the 2000 points the Dow Industrials have risen so far this year, more than a quarter came from the surge of a single company — Boeing, whose shares are up 53% in 2017. That Boeing juggernaut has contributed about 580 points to the Dow's 2017 rise, per the WSJ's Justin Lahart.

  • The Dow pushed through the symbolic 22,000 barrier today, carried by a 6.9% rise in Apple's shares that added 60 points to the index of the biggest 30 industrial companies.
  • Apple — with a 35% overall share price increase so far in 2017 — is also responsible for about 350 of the Dow's approximately 2000-point rise.
  • McDonald's shares — up 29% this year — have contributed 227 points to the Dow surge.

This has happened for three consecutive administrations: President Donald Trump has made the stock surge a standard feature of his tweets and stump speeches, boasting in one sample tweet that we are watching the "highest stock market EVER." But in a post today, Axios' Dan Primack notes that former presidents George H.W. Bush and Barack Obama had better S&P500 stock performance in their first six months in office.

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Trump says he will campaign against Lisa Murkowski after her support for Mattis

Trump with Barr and Meadows outside St. John's Episcopal church in Washington, D.C. on June 1. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty Images

President Trump tweeted on Thursday that he would endorse "any candidate" with a pulse who runs against Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska).

Driving the news: Murkowski said on Thursday that she supported former defense secretary James Mattis' condemnation of Trump over his response to protests in the wake of George Floyd's killing. She described Mattis' statement as "true, honest, necessary and overdue," Politico's Andrew Desiderio reports.

5 hours ago - World

The president vs. the Pentagon

Trump visits Mattis and the Pentagon in 2018. Photo: Brendan Smialowski/AFP via Getty

Over the course of just a few hours, President Trump was rebuffed by the Secretary of Defense over his call for troops in the streets and accused by James Mattis, his former Pentagon chief, of trampling the Constitution for political gain.

Why it matters: Current and former leaders of the U.S. military are drawing a line over Trump's demand for a militarized response to the protests and unrest that have swept the country over the killing of George Floyd by police.

New York Times says Tom Cotton op-ed did not meet standards

Photo: Avalon/Universal Images Group via Getty Images)

A New York Times spokesperson said in a statement Thursday that the paper will be changing its editorial board processes after a Wednesday op-ed by Sen. Tom Cotton (R-Ark.), which called for President Trump to "send in the troops" in order to quell violent protests, failed to meet its standards.

Why it matters: The shift comes after Times employees began a coordinated movement on social media on Wednesday and Thursday that argued that publishing the op-ed put black staff in danger. Cotton wrote that Trump should invoke the Insurrection Act in order to deploy the U.S. military against rioters that have overwhelmed police forces in cities across the country.