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Judge may tell jury about Uber's secretive behavior in Waymo case

Anthony Levandowski, then-head of Uber's self-driving program, speaks about their driverless car in San Francisco. Photo: Eric Risberg / AP

As Waymo and Uber head into the final stretch before the trial over alleged trade secret theft, the two companies bickered in court over Uber's failure to bring up critical documents, how Uber can inquire about Waymo's workplace policies, and Waymo's request for monetary damages.

Why it matters: Uber could be in for an even bumpier trial if the judge decides that Uber's delays in producing documents and apparent attempts to conceal some of them can be revealed to the jury.

  • "The question that I am trying to figure out is how much of that story should be told to the jury," said Judge William Alsup. "If both sides were playing fair and square…Then you get to decide the case strictly on the merits."
  • Monday's hearing was also a reminder of Waymo's own attempts to keep its business as confidential as possible while trying to expose as much of Uber's in open court: Waymo is seeking to close the courtroom for significant portions of the trial.