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Photo: Nicolas Economou/NurPhoto via Getty Images

JPMorgan Chase said Tuesday the bank has sent a number of its employees in New York City home after an unspecified number tested positive for the coronavirus, Bloomberg first reported.

Why it matters: Roughly one week after workers started trickling back into offices after Labor Day weekend, news of the infection was communicated internally, serving as just one example of how the spread of the coronavirus will make it challenging to bring staff back from remote work, Bloomberg writes.

  • JPMorgan had previously announced that employees would be required to work in their offices by Sept. 21 — prompting praise and congratulations from President Trump.

What they're saying: CEO Jamie Dimon has previously expressed concern that remote work could have some consequences if it's prolonged, and said it makes sense to “carefully open up and see if we can get the economy growing for the sake of everybody.”

  • Dimon has said worker productivity has decreased as employees continue with remote work.
  • JPMorgan has been "managing individual cases" of workers testing positive "across the firm over the course of the last few months and following appropriate protocols when they occur," bank spokesperson Brian Marchiony said Tuesday, per CBS News.
  • Marchiony did not specify how many people had tested positive within the organization.

Go deeper

DeVos extends federal student loan relief to Jan. 31

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos. Photo: Nicholas Kamm/AFP via Getty Images

The Trump administration is extending federal student loan relief, which includes a pause on payments and interest accrual, through Jan. 31, the Department of Education announced Friday.

Why it matters: Payments have been paused since March due to the coronavirus pandemic, but the relief was set to expire on Dec. 31 . The relief measures, which also include the suspension of collections of defaulted federal student loans, have helped mitigate some of the pandemic's negative consequences for millions of borrowers.

Updated 5 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

  1. Politics: Fauci says he accepted Biden's offer to be chief medical adviser "on the spot" — The recovery needs rocket fuel.
  2. Economy: U.S. economy adds 245,000 jobs in November as recovery slows — America's hidden depression: K-shaped recovery threatens Biden administration.
  3. Education: Devos extends federal student loan relief to Jan. 31
  4. States: New Mexico to allow hospitals to ration coronavirus medical care
  5. Vaccine: What vaccine trials still need to do.
  6. World: UN warns "2021 is literally going to be catastrophic"
  7. 🎧 Podcast: Former FDA chief Rob Califf on the vaccine approval process.
Dec 4, 2020 - World

UN: "2021 is literally going to be catastrophic"

David Beasley, executive director of the World Food Programme. Photo: Souleymane Ag Anara/AFP via Getty Images

Next year is "going to be catastrophic" in terms of worldwide humanitarian crises, World Food Program executive director David Beasley warned on Friday, per Reuters.

Driving the news: The stark outlook comes as many countries contend with not only the coronavirus pandemic, but also possible famine, economic instability, conflict and other humanitarian crises. A record 235 million people will need humanitarian assistance and protection next year, a nearly 40% increase from 2020, the UN projected earlier this week

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