Joy-Ann Reid, Host, AM Joy. Photo: Duane Prokop/NBC/NBCU Photo Bank via Getty Images

Joy-Ann Reid has responded to criticism for homophobic blog posts and others that dive in to 9/11 conspiracies and criticism of Sen. John McCain, under her name at her former blog explaining that "[t]here are things I deeply regret and am embarrassed by, things I would have said differently and issues where my position has changed. Today I’m sincerely apologizing again."

MSNBC released a statement soon after saying "Some of the things written by Joy on her old blog are obviously hateful and hurtful. They are not reflective of the colleague and friend we have known at MSNBC for the past seven years. Joy has apologized publicly and privately Joyand said she has grown and evolved in the many years since, and we know this to be true."

Joy-Ann Reid's full statement:

"While I published my blog, starting in 2005, I wrote thousands of posts in real time on the issues of the day. There are things I deeply regret and am embarrassed by, things I would have said differently and issues where my position has changed. Today I’m sincerely apologizing again.

I’m sorry for the collateral damage and pain this is causing individuals and committees caught in the crossfire.

To be clear, I have the highest respect for Sen. McCain as a public servant and patriot and wish him and his family the best. I have reached out to Meghan McCain and will continue to do so. She is a former on-air colleague and I feel deeply for her and her family.

I’ve also spoken openly about my evolution on many issues and know that I’m a better person today than I was a decade ago. I am the daughter of immigrants and have worked to be a strong ally of these communities. There is no question in my mind that Al Qaeda perpetrated the 9/11 attacks or about Israel’s right to its sovereignty.

I believe the totality of my work attests to my ideals and I continue to grow every day."

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