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Kimber Avra sits by a cross honoring her friend Micayla Medek at a remembrance ceremony on July 20, 2013 in Aurora, Colo. Photo: Dana Romanoff/Getty Images

The Aurora, Colo., movie theater where a 2012 mass shooting took place during a screening of "The Dark Knight Rises" will not show the forthcoming "Joker," reports the Hollywood Reporter.

What's happening: Relatives and friends of those killed also penned a letter about their concerns to Warner Bros. regarding the new film's premiere. It states that they are "calling on [the studio] to be a part of the growing chorus of corporate leaders who understand that they have a social responsibility to keep us all safe."

  • The letter asks Warner Bros. to donate to groups that support victims of gun violence and not to donate to political candidates who support the NRA.

What they're saying: Some Aurora families have expressed concern that "Joker" — which features Joaquin Phoenix as a mentally ill antihero and killer who becomes Batman's foe — hits too close to home.

  • James Holmes, who killed 12 and injured 70 in the Aurora shooting, had dyed hair similar to the Joker's at the time of the shooting. It was also incorrectly reported that he referred to himself as "the Joker" at the time of his arrest — a connection likely spurred due to his decision to attack a screening of a Batman film.
  • Sandy Phillips, whose daughter Jessica Ghawi died during the shooting, told THR that the new film is like a "slap in the face" and expressed concern that the audience may connect with the volatile character and find inspiration in the film.

Go deeper: How CEOs trump politicians

Go deeper

President Joe Biden vows to be "a president for all Americans"

Moments after taking the oath of office, President Joe Biden sought to soothe a nation riven by political divisions and a global pandemic, while warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country and defeat a "virus that silently stalks the the country."

Why it matters: From the same steps that a pro-Trump mob launched an assault on Congress two weeks earlier, the new president paid deference to the endurance of American political institutions.

Updated 38 mins ago - Politics & Policy

Inauguration Day dashboard

U.S. Capitol and stage are lit at sunrise ahead of the inauguration of Joe Biden. Photo: Patrick Semansky - Pool/Getty Images

President Biden has delivered his inaugural address at the Capitol, calling for an end to the politics as total war but warning that "we have far to go" to heal the country.

What's next: Biden and Vice President Harris review readiness of military troops, a long-standing tradition to signify the peaceful transfer of power.

Updated 1 hour ago - Politics & Policy

In photos: The Biden and Harris inauguration

Joe Biden is sworn in as the 46th president of the United States. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris were inaugurated as president and vice president respectively in a ceremony at the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday morning.

Why it matters: Top Democrats and Republicans gathered for the peaceful transfer of power only two weeks after an unprecedented siege on the building by Trump supporters to disrupt certification of Biden's victory. Trump did not attend Wednesday's ceremony.

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