Jan 31, 2020 - Politics & Policy

John Delaney drops out of 2020 presidential race

John Delaney. Photo: Joshua Lott/Getty Images

Former Rep. John Delaney (D-Md.) announced Friday that he was dropping out of the 2020 presidential race.

The big picture: Delaney was the first Democrat to announce his candidacy in the 2020 election, yet failed to establish himself once the field grew. In July, Axios reported that Delaney's staff had asked him to drop out, suggesting he wasn't spending enough money to run a competitive race and had flopped at the first debate.

  • At the time, Delaney denied the accusations, stating he had "no plans to drop out of the race."
  • He failed to qualify for later debates — benchmarks largely seen as a make-or-break moments for campaigns.
  • Questioned by Medium in December as to why he was still in the race, Delaney said his plan was "to do well in Iowa, and send a message that a candidate that actually focuses on rural Iowa, and focuses on campaigning in people’s living rooms and in coffee shops, still matters."

The state of play: The campaign said in the announcement that Delaney had decided to drop out after concluding that he would not reach the 15% viability threshold across much of Iowa — but still had enough support to hurt other moderate candidates.

What he's saying:

"Let’s stop the nonsense of unrealistic and divisive campaign promises and be the party the American people need — a decent, unifying, future-focused and common-sense party. And please don’t listen to the cynics, the naysayers and the dividers; while we have significant challenges and too many Americans are struggling, the world gets better every year and the United States of America has driven much of this progress — let’s keep it that way."

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The 2020 Democratic candidates winning the money game

Data: 2019 FEC filings. Donations do not include funds from political committees or the candidates themselves. Chart: Danielle Alberti/Axios

In a primary race stacked with billionaires, the candidates raising the most money don't necessarily have all the same advantages.

Between the lines: Michael Bloomberg and Tom Steyer are easily able to outspend and outlast any other 2020 campaign. But while fundraising numbers show how powerful and long-lasting a campaign could be in a long election cycle, they are also a sign of support and excitement around a candidate — something money can't always buy.

4 key takeaways from the Democratic debate in New Hampshire

Photo: Win McNamee/Getty Images

The attacks grew more direct and the fault lines more defined Friday night at the eighth Democratic debate, as candidates looked to either capitalize on their Iowa momentum or stop the bleeding four days before New Hampshire primary.

Why it matters: Pete Buttigieg has the chance to make a huge statement if he can pull off a victory in New Hampshire, a state that his fellow Iowa frontrunner Bernie Sanders won in a landslide in 2016. Joe Biden, meanwhile, seemed ready to concede at the outset of the debate: "I took a hit in Iowa, and I’ll probably take one here."

Deval Patrick drops out of 2020 presidential race

Photo: David Becker/Getty Images.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick dropped out of the 2020 presidential race on Wednesday, thinning the Democratic field even further after the New Hampshire primary, CNN reports.

The big picture: Patrick was a late entrant to the race, announcing his candidacy in November and missing the filing deadlines for both Alabama and Arkansas. With less than three months to build momentum for the Iowa caucuses, he failed to make a splash in the polls and did not qualify for any debates.

Go deeper: Why Baby Yoda should scare Michael Bloomberg and Deval Patrick