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Former national security adviser John Bolton on stage at Duke University on Monday. Photo: Melissa Sue Gerrits/Getty Images

Former national security adviser John Bolton said during a talk at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, he hopes his new book is "not suppressed" by the White House, according to journalists present in the room.

This is an effort to write history and I did it the best I can. We'll have to see what comes out of the censorship."
— JohnBolton's comments, per Bloomberg and the New York Times

Why it matters: This is the first time Bolton has spoken publicly following President Trump's acquittal in the Senate on the charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress.

  • Per Axios' Jonathan Swan, Bolton alleges in his book that the president tied the freezing of $391 million in security assistance to Ukraine to demands for investigations into his political opponent former Vice President Joe Biden. Trump strongly denies the claim.

The big picture: Bolton and his lawyers have clashed with the White House over the contents of his book, "The Room Where It Happened: A White House Memoir," due to be published on March 17.

  • The White House has said that Bolton's manuscript contains "significant amounts of classified information" that could "cause exceptionally grave harm" to U.S. national security. Bolton rejects this assertion.

What they're saying: During their discussion, Duke University professor Peter Feaver asked Bolton about Trump's July 25 phone call with Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelensky, which was at the heart Trump's impeachment and Senate trial, according to the News & Observer, which had a reporter present at the event where audio and livestreaming were not permitted.

  • Per journalists present, Bolton said, "To me, there are portions of the manuscript that deal with Ukraine. ... I view them like the sprinkles on the ice cream sundae, meaning in terms of what’s in the book."
  • When asked if Trump's call with Zelensky was as "perfect" as the president described, Bolton replied, "You'll love chapter 14," the News & Observer noted.
  • Bolton said he couldn't answer some questions because of the "threat of litigation from the executive branch," the News & Observer noted.
  • Feaver also asked Bolton about Trump's tweets about him since he left the White House last September, "including on their disagreement over Venezuela policy," according to the Wall Street Journal, which had a reporter at the event.
  • Per journalists present, Bolton pointed to the White House review of his manuscript and said, "He tweets, but I can't talk about it. How fair is that?"
  • Axios has contacted the White House for comment on Bolton's latest remarks.

Go deeper:

Go deeper

Arizona Republicans censure Cindy McCain and GOP governor

Combination images of Cindy McCain and Gov. Doug Ducey. Photo: FilmMagic/FilmMagic for U.S.VETS/Michael Brochstein/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images

Arizona Republican Party members voted on Saturday to censure prominent GOP figures Cindy McCain, Gov. Doug Ducey and former Sen. Jeff Flake (R-Ariz.), who've all faced clashes with former President Trump, per AZCentral.

Why it matters: Although the resolution is symbolic, this move plus the re-election of Trump loyalist Kelli Ward as state GOP chair shows the strong hold the former president has on the party in Arizona, despite President Biden winning the state in the 2020 election.

Updated 4 hours ago - Politics & Policy

Coronavirus dashboard

Illustration: Eniola Odetunde/Axios

  1. Health: Most vulnerable Americans aren't getting enough vaccine information — Fauci says Trump administration's lack of facts on COVID "very likely" cost lives.
  2. Education: Schools face an uphill battle to reopen during the pandemic.
  3. Vaccine: Florida requiring proof of residency to get vaccine — CDC extends interval between vaccine doses for exceptional cases.
  4. World: Hong Kong puts tens of thousands on lockdown as cases surge — Pfizer to supply 40 million vaccine doses to lower-income countries — Brazil begins distributing AstraZeneca vaccine.
  5. Sports: 2021 Tokyo Olympics hang in the balance.
  6. 🎧 Podcast: Carbon Health's CEO on unsticking the vaccine bottleneck.

DOJ: Capitol rioter threatened to "assassinate" Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez

Supporters of former President Trump storm the U.S. Captiol on Jan. 6. Photo: Kent Nishimura / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images

A Texas man who has been charged with storming the U.S. Capitol in the deadly Jan. 6 siege posted death threats against Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), the Department of Justice said.

The big picture: Garret Miller faces five charges in connection to the riot by supporters of former President Trump, including violent entry and disorderly conduct on Capitol grounds and making threats. According to court documents, Miller posted violent threats online the day of the siege, including tweeting “Assassinate AOC.”