Mar 3, 2020 - Politics & Policy

John Bolton's book delayed until May because of White House review

Photo: Melissa Sue Gerrits/Getty Images

The publication of former national security adviser John Bolton's book "The Room Where It Happened" has been delayed from March 17 until May as the White House continues to review the manuscript, CNN reports.

Why it matters: The memoir, which claims that President Trump linked Ukraine aid to investigations of his political rivals, was at the heart of Trump's impeachment inquiry — although Bolton ultimately never testified before the House or Senate. The Trump administration says that it is reviewing the book's content to ensure it does not endanger national security, though Bolton publicly worried last month that the White House may use the review process to suppress its publication.

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It's been a year since the last daily White House press briefing

Photo: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

The last daily White House press briefing was held one year ago — on March 11, 2019, when Sarah Huckabee Sanders was still President Trump's press secretary.

Why it matters: It's a significant milestone that is emblematic of the erosion of traditional norms regarding interactions between the White House and the press corps under the Trump administration.

Appeals court rules House can access Mueller grand jury evidence

Robert Mueller. Photo: Alex Wong/Getty Images

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit ruled 2-1 Tuesday to allow the House to access secret grand jury testimony from special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Why it matters: The decision gives the House a win in a separation-of-powers dispute with the Trump administration, and it's one of many feuds between the administration and Congress that have played out in the courts in recent months.

Fiona Hill: Putin has the U.S. "exactly where he wants us"

Fiona Hill testifies in impeachment inquiry of President Trump on Nov. 21, 2019. Photo: Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post via Getty Images

Fiona Hill, the former top Russia expert on the National Security Council, said that Russian President Vladimir Putin has the U.S. "feeling vulnerable, he's got us feeling on edge, and he's got us questioning the legitimacy of our own systems" in a "60 Minutes" interview airing on Sunday.

The big picture: The nation's top election-security official warned the House Intelligence Committee last month that Russia is interfering in the 2020 election to help President Trump get re-elected and to continue attempting to sow discord among the U.S. electorate.