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Data: SimilarWeb; Chart: Naema Ahmed/Axios

Traffic to career sites like Indeed.com, Careerbuilder.com, Monster.com and others is down during the coronavirus pandemic, according to a new half-year traffic report from SimilarWeb.

Why it matters: The CARES Act may have made it easier for job seekers to delay employment searches, according to SimilarWeb. Record unemployment could also suggest that people are hiring less.

  • More than half of the visits to sites in the career category were made by people ages 34 and under.

Details: Overall, all sites within the career category experienced year-to-date decreases in monthly unique viewers, and the category as a whole saw a decrease of 14.6%.

  • The top five non-branded organic keywords driving traffic to the category were "jobs near me," "jobs," 'cover letter," "work from home jobs," and "interview questions."

The big picture: Across the 10 categories measured in SimilarWeb, most seem to be rising and falling as expected.

  • The news and media category is experiencing explosive growth, as consumers itch for more information about the pandemic and the economy.
  • Traffic to marketplaces, like Amazon.com, Walmart.com, and Target.com is soaring, thanks to the migration of traditional retail to e-commerce.
  • Traffic to airlines and accommodations sites is notably way down.

Go deeper: Worry about negative July jobs report grows

Go deeper

Bryan Walsh, author of Future
Oct 21, 2020 - Economy & Business

Coronavirus pandemic postpones jobs of the future

Data: Cognizant; Chart: Andrew Witherspoon/Axios

Many of the digital jobs of the future have suffered during the later stages of the pandemic, while in-person health care jobs are on the rise.

Why it matters: Automation and digitization will profoundly change the U.S. labor market, but that future has been delayed as COVID-19 forces companies to shift into survival mode.

Off the Rails

Episode 2: Barbarians at the Oval

Photo illustration: Sarah Grillo/Axios. Photo: Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

Beginning on election night 2020 and continuing through his final days in office, Donald Trump unraveled and dragged America with him, to the point that his followers sacked the U.S. Capitol with two weeks left in his term. This Axios series takes you inside the collapse of a president.

Episode 2: Trump stops buying what his professional staff are telling him, and increasingly turns to radical voices telling him what he wants to hear.

President Trump plunked down in an armchair in the White House residence, still dressed from his golf game — navy fleece, black pants, white MAGA cap. It was Saturday, Nov. 7. The networks had just called the election for Joe Biden.

Fringe right plots new attacks out of sight

Illustration: Aïda Amer/Axios

Domestic extremists are using obscure and private corners of the internet to plot new attacks ahead of Inauguration Day. Their plans are also hidden in plain sight, buried in podcasts and online video platforms.

Why it matters: Because law enforcement was caught flat-footed during last week's Capitol siege, researchers and intelligence agencies are paying more attention to online threats that could turn into real-world violence.